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Where can you get levaquin

NEW YORK where can you get levaquin and SALT LAKE CITY, Aug. 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Northwell Health today joined Health Catalyst, Inc. ("Health Catalyst," where can you get levaquin Nasdaq.

HCAT), a leading provider of data and analytics technology and services to healthcare organizations, in announcing a long-term strategic partnership to transform the quality of patient care by using data and analytics to better anticipate and respond to the evolving needs of patients, providers and payers in today's rapidly evolving healthcare ecosystem. In this partnership, Health Catalyst will provide solutions to allow for increased cloud-based reliance on data and analytics, while sharing insights and best practices from a decade of support to hundreds of other healthcare clients. This will accelerate greater efficiency in data mapping and data storage where can you get levaquin to/with the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) and the affordable emergence of an enterprise solution for meaningful and measurable clinical, financial and operational improvements.

The solutions will be used across the Northwell Health enterprise, which includes the Feinstein Institute and Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra. "Northwell Health's goal is a simple one that has not changed since our inception. Be better where can you get levaquin tomorrow than we are today.

Partnering with Health Catalyst will allow us to accelerate the generation of critical insights for one of the world's most diverse patient populations which includes more than 11 million individuals who will potentially turn to us for care," said Michael Dowling, President and CEO of Northwell Health. "Health Catalyst's Augmented Intelligence (AI) and data science experience and expertise, along with our shared cultural attributes and mission alignment, will allow us to use data-informed decision making to achieve our shared commitment of transforming healthcare for the communities we serve."Northwell Health is New York State's largest health care provider and private employer, with 23 hospitals, nearly 800 outpatient facilities and more than 18,500 affiliated physicians. More than 11,000 COVID-19 patients where can you get levaquin have received care from Northwell's 16,000-plus nurses and 4,000 employed doctors, including members of Northwell Health Physician Partners, and using 1,600 additional COVID-19 focused beds."We are honored to have the opportunity to join Northwell Health on its mission-driven journey to transform healthcare," said Dan Burton, CEO of Health Catalyst.

"We have deep respect for our Northwell colleagues and are excited about combining our Solution with Northwell's team members' experience, knowledge and passion for improvement. We are also honored to have Northwell's CEO Michael Dowling as a keynote speaker at Health Catalyst's upcoming Healthcare Analytics Summit (HAS), where we'll hear his important perspectives on the COVID-19 pandemic and the future of healthcare delivery." This partnership will be built using Health Catalyst's DOS™ technology, a data-first analytics and application platform, to capture and map raw data into meaningful, actionable insights. Northwell Health will also immediately where can you get levaquin have access to Health Catalyst's growing suite of COVID-19 solutions, including but not limited to a registry, staff and patient tracker and capacity planning tool.

Broadly sharing Northwell Health's data driven insights from its COVID-19 work is another significant opportunity for transformational care."Health Catalyst will become our data and analytics backbone, as their Solutions will enable our organization to take our current data adoption and transformation to entirely new heights," said John Bosco, Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer at Northwell Health. "We are looking forward to leaning on DOS to create an affordable, yet innovative enterprise solution that will further enable transformative care to the patients we serve."About Northwell HealthNorthwell Health is New York State's largest health care provider and private employer, with 23 hospitals, 665 outpatient facilities and more than 18,500 affiliated physicians. We care for over two where can you get levaquin million people annually in the New York metro area and beyond, thanks to philanthropic support from our communities.

Our 66,000 employees – 16,000-plus nurses and 4,000 employed doctors, including members of Northwell Health Physician Partners – are working to change health care for the better. We are making breakthroughs in medicine at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research. We are training the next generation of medical professionals at the where can you get levaquin visionary Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell and the Hofstra Northwell School of Graduate Nursing and Physician Assistant Studies.

For information on our more than 100 medical specialties, visit Northwell.edu.About Health CatalystHealth Catalyst is a leading provider of data and analytics technology and services to healthcare organizations, and is committed to being the catalyst for massive, measurable, data-informed healthcare improvement. Its customers leverage the cloud-based data platform—powered by data from more than 100 million patient records and encompassing trillions of facts—as well as its analytics software and professional services expertise to make data-informed decisions and realize measurable clinical, financial and operational improvements. Health Catalyst where can you get levaquin envisions a future in which all healthcare decisions are data informed.

Northwell Health Media Contact:Michelle Pinto516-321-6708mpinto@northwell.edu Health Catalyst Media Contact:Kristen BerrySenior Vice President, Public Relations+1 (617) 234-4123+1 (774) 573-0455 (m)kberry@we-worldwide.com View original content to download multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/health-catalyst-and-northwell-health-partner-to-transform-patient-care-with-cloud-based-data-and-analytics-enterprise-solution-301110803.htmlSOURCE Health CatalystSALT LAKE CITY, Aug. 11, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Health Catalyst, Inc. (“Health Catalyst,” where can you get levaquin Nasdaq.

HCAT), a leading provider of data and analytics technology and services to healthcare organizations, today announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Vitalware, LLC, a Yakima, Washington-based provider of revenue workflow optimization and analytics SaaS technology solutions to healthcare organizations.Vitalware’s flagship offering is a Best in KLAS chargemaster management solution that delivers results for the complex regulatory and compliance functions needed by all healthcare provider systems. Additionally, Vitalware brings to bear newer product suites in Revenue Integrity, to help health systems capture lost revenue, and Price Transparency, to support compliance with expanding pricing transparency regulation. Importantly, Vitalware offers Health Catalyst a strategic anchor technology in where can you get levaquin the revenue space, expanding its CFO offering and value proposition.

Vitalware’s solutions support all major EMRs and act as a key integration point for health systems with multiple EMRs.Health Catalyst CEO Dan Burton said, “We are excited to welcome the Vitalware team to support our shared mission to be the catalyst for massive, measurable improvements. In addition to adding a best in KLAS technology solution from Vitalware, this acquisition is another powerful example of Health Catalyst’s ability to integrate and scale software on top of our DOS™ platform. Ultimately, DOS, our cloud-based data platform, will further enhance the analytics insights made available by Vitalware’s technology by integrating charge and revenue data with where can you get levaquin claims, cost, and quality data.”“Vitalware, since inception, has been about delivering solutions that provide critical insights and better financial outcomes to health systems,” said Vitalware CEO and Co-founder, Kerry Martin.

€œWe have a great team committed to our clients and their success, and adding the expertise and solutions from the Health Catalyst team will allow Vitalware to deliver even more innovative solutions. Our number one priority continues to be to create positive outcomes for our clients, and we’re confident the combination of our resources with Health Catalyst will only accelerate that effort.”Health Catalyst expects to fund the transaction using a mix of stock and cash. The parties expect the transaction, which is subject to customary closing conditions, to close in the third or fourth quarter of 2020 where can you get levaquin.

Further details regarding the acquisition will be reported on a Form 8-K filing that will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission today.About Health CatalystHealth Catalyst is a leading provider of data and analytics technology and services to healthcare organizations, and is committed to being the catalyst for massive, measurable, data-informed healthcare improvement. Its customers leverage the cloud-based data platform—powered by data from more than 100 million patient records and encompassing trillions of facts—as well as its analytics software and professional services expertise to make data-informed decisions and realize measurable clinical, financial and operational improvements. Health Catalyst envisions a future in which all healthcare decisions where can you get levaquin are data informed.About VitalwareVitalware is the leading mid-cycle revenue SaaS solutions provider, specializing in Health-IT applications aimed at making the business of healthcare easier through its intuitive cloud-based technologies and regulatory content expertise.

With nearly 1,000 hospitals on its client roster, Vitalware’s product portfolio is the healthcare industry’s best solution for providing visibility and continuity in chargemaster management, pricing transparency, charge capture, and regulatory code references. Beyond providing tools, and healthcare regulatory and compliance resources, Vitalware offers professional services designed to support organizations’ need of coding guidance, process improvement, education, and financial impact solutions. Vitalware is recognized as a 2020 Best in where can you get levaquin KLAS software for its VitalCDM® platform.

Visit our website, www.vitalware.com.Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking StatementsThis press release contains forward-looking statements relating to expectations, plans, and prospects including expectations relating to our ability to close, and the timing of the closing of, this transaction and the benefits that will be derived from this transaction. These forward-looking statements are based upon the current expectations and beliefs of Health Catalyst’s management as of the date of this release, and are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described in the forward-looking statements including, without limitation, the risk of adverse and unpredictable macro-economic conditions and risks related to closing this transaction and integration of the companies. All forward-looking statements in this press release are based on information available to the Company as of the date hereof, and Health where can you get levaquin Catalyst disclaims any obligation to update these forward-looking statements.Health Catalyst Investor Relations Contact:Adam BrownSenior Vice President, Investor Relations+1 (855)-309-6800ir@healthcatalyst.comHealth Catalyst Media Contact:Kristen BerrySenior Vice President, Public Relations+1 (617) 234-4123+1 (774) 573-0455 (m)kberry@we-worldwide.com Source.

Health Catalyst, Inc.The recent death of 43-year-old “Black Panther” actor Chadwick Boseman is bringing renewed attention to colon cancer and the need for regular screenings. Medical oncologist May Cho calls colonoscopies “the gold standard” of colon cancer screening.May Cho is a medical oncologist specializing in the treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, including colorectal cancer, at the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center. She is also an assistant professor at the UC Davis where can you get levaquin School of Medicine.

She answered some common questions about colorectal cancer, its symptoms and diagnosis.What is colon cancer, or colorectal cancer?. Colorectal cancer includes bowel cancer, colon cancer and rectal cancer -- any cancer that affects the colon and the rectum. According to statistics from where can you get levaquin the American Cancer Society, the overall lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer is about 1 in 23 for men and 1 in 25 for women. Hereditary, environmental and lifestyle factors can affect your risk for developing colorectal cancer.

What was your reaction when you heard about the death of Chadwick Boseman due to colon cancer?. He was so young and productive. It was so heartbreaking to hear but unfortunately wasn’t much of where can you get levaquin a shock to me.

The incidence rates of colorectal cancer for people younger than age 50 are on the rise. This is an alarming and rising trend that I see in my clinic. We should learn where can you get levaquin two things from this untimely loss.

Colorectal cancer diagnosis is rising in younger patients, and you can still be productive and enjoy quality of life with appropriate cancer treatments.What are the symptoms of colorectal cancer?. Why are they overlooked?. Symptoms include rectal bleeding, often misdiagnosed as hemorrhoids, changes in bowel movement, constipation or diarrhea which you have not typically where can you get levaquin had before, unexplained weight loss, fatigue and bloating.

All of these are symptoms. You should be alarmed if the symptoms persist. Don’t wait where can you get levaquin more than two or three months.

You should see your doctor to seek procedures such as a colonoscopy if the symptoms continue.When should people start getting screened for colon cancer?. The American Cancer Society guidelines now call for screening at the age of 45, rather than 50, due to increased incidence of colorectal cancer in younger patients. The next steps to follow depend on where can you get levaquin what the gastrointestinal physician finds through screening.

If everything looks good and there are no symptoms, then the patient can return to get checked every ten years.Precancerous polyps can be safely removed and prevent the development of colon cancer.If a person is having symptoms, don’t wait. You can advocate for yourself to get the screening done even if your age does not fall into the obvious guidelines.We are still trying to learn the cause. Most patients have sporadic cancer, which we suspect is due to our environment or our lifestyle changes where can you get levaquin.

We are seeing changes in the past two decades creating this shift. We’re studying it as much as we can.What’s involved in the screening?. A colonoscopy is the gold standard for where can you get levaquin screening and the preferred way to diagnose gastrointestinal cancers.

It is the only way you can really look at the colon and detect polyps. There are screening tests that look at cancer DNA or blood in the stool (feces), but they are not as good a tool as a colonoscopy. What do where can you get levaquin you tell patients who are nervous to get a colonoscopy?.

This is a cancer that can be prevented through early detection. A colonoscopy is a routine procedure that we’ve being doing for decades. The patient is asked to prepare where can you get levaquin in advance, including a special liquid diet.

Then they are given anesthesia and typically have no memory of the procedure. The risks associated with the procedure are very low compared to the immense benefit of finding underlying disease that is going where can you get levaquin undetected. What kind of work is UC Davis Health doing to advance colorectal cancer research and care?.

We work with our communities to offer prevention screening and education. We also have several active where can you get levaquin clinical trials studying colorectal cancer. The trials investigate effective treatment strategies such as immunotherapy, targeted therapy, chemotherapy and liver directed therapy, as most colon cancers tend to spread to the liver.

If you or someone you know is interested in participating in one of these studies, please reach out to your doctor to find out more, or visit the list of cancer clinical trials at the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center.Skip to main content Newsroom News | Careers | Giving | UC Davis Health Enter keywords or phrases Toggle navigation About Us UC Davis Health School of Medicine Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing Medical Group Medical Center Overview About UC Davis Health Office of the Vice Chancellor Facts and Figures Points of Distinction 2020 Awards and Honors Strategic Plan Upcoming Events Contact Us Giving Health Services Primary and Specialty Care Find a Doctor or Provider 2019 Open Enrollment Primary Care Specialty Care Medical Center Featured Clinical Programs Comprehensive Cancer Center Children's Hospital Birth Center Heart and Vascular Services MIND Institute Telehealth Services Comprehensive Surgical Services Primary Care See All Clinical Services ... Other Clinical Resources AccepFace shields and valved masks — two options many people find more comfortable than cloth face coverings — appear to be less effective at blocking viral particles than regular masks, a new study shows.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had already stated that clear plastic face shields and masks equipped with vents or valves are not recommended, because of concerns that they don’t adequately block viral particles where can you get levaquin. But the new research, which uses lasers to illuminate the path of coughs, offers a striking visual demonstration of how large plumes of particles can escape from behind a face shield or vented mask.“I think these visualizations are really powerful for helping the general public to see and understand what’s happening,” said Linsey Marr, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Virginia Tech who studies airborne particles but who was not involved in the research.The news will be disappointing to those looking for an alternative to regular face masks.

Teachers and students, in particular, often prefer face shields because they are more comfortable to wear over long periods of time, can be easily cleaned and allow for better communication because they don’t muffle the voice or hide facial expressions. Valved masks, with one-way vents designed to allow breath to escape while blocking germs from entering, can feel more breathable and prevent the mask from getting moist as quickly.But the new research, published in the journal Physics of Fluids, where can you get levaquin shows that face shields alone and vented masks allow large plumes of particles to escape, putting those around you at risk. And while the research did not specifically look at the level of protection the shields and masks offer the wearer, it does suggest that people who use them may also be more vulnerable to exposure than if they wore a regular mask.

Valved masks are a particular concern — some of the nonmedical vented masks the researchers used had faulty valves, suggesting that some people may be walking around with open valves — essentially large holes — in their masks. #styln-briefing-block where can you get levaquin { font-family. Nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif.

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} } Latest Updates. The Coronavirus Outbreak Updated 2020-09-01T22:08:02.814Z Your smartphone may soon let you know you’ve been exposed. Children of color are infected and hospitalized at higher rates than white children, new U.S.

Research shows. Florida severs ties with Quest for taking too long to report 75,000 test results, DeSantis says. See more updates More live coverage.

Markets To conduct the research, scientists from Florida Atlantic University used hollow plastic heads fitted with various face coverings. They pumped a vaporized mixture of glycerin and distilled water through the heads to simulate a cough or sneeze, and used lasers to illuminate the path of the plume.In two separate studies, the researchers showed that even the best masks allow some particles to escape. In videos of tests using the gold-standard mask, an N95, a puff of particles can be seen jetting out around the bridge of the nose, where the fit is poor.

(Other studies have shown that N95 masks, which should filter 95 percent of small particles, lose about a third of their filtering potential if the fit is improper.) That said, the researchers found that N95 masks, cloth masks and papery medical-style masks all block a significant amount of particles and appear to offer adequate protection for the typical person in the community who is practicing social distancing.Laser studies show small droplets escaping from the bottom of a face shield.Credit...Courtesy of Physics of FluidsBut when the hollow heads were fitted with clear plastic face shields or valved masks, the results were less encouraging. While the face shields did a good job blocking the initial splatter from the simulated cough, the laser illumination showed that plumes of aerosolized particles swirled out from under the shield.“Masks act as filters and actually capture the droplets and any other particles we expel,” said Siddhartha Verma, assistant professor in the department of ocean and mechanical engineering at Florida Atlantic University and the study’s lead author. €œShields are not able to do that.

If the droplets are large they will be stopped by the plastic shield. But if they are aerosol sized, 10 microns or smaller, they’ll just escape from the sides or the bottom of the shield. Everything that is expelled will very likely get distributed in the room.”Droplets escaping from the valve of a mask.Credit...Journal of FluidsWhen a standard N95 mask with a valve was tested, a large cloud of particles also escaped through the valve, but the vent directed the plume downward.

Standard N95 masks with valves, which are often used by construction workers and painters to prevent inhalation of dust and other particles, meet standards set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Even so, valved respirator masks are not allowed in sterile medical environments because they allow the wearer’s germs to escape. During the pandemic, a number of knockoff versions of valved masks have appeared on the market, and while the valves look authentic, they don’t really work.In a mask with a working valve, the pressure inside the masks forces a small disk to open and let air out, but when you inhale the disk fits tightly against the hole and doesn’t allow air in.

€œWhat we found was that everything escapes through that exhalation valve,” said Manhar R. Dhanak, a study co-author and chairman of the university’s department of ocean and mechanical engineering. €œAnd in some of the non-N95 commercial masks, the valve just appeared to be cosmetic.

They didn’t function because they were of poor quality, so the disks basically didn’t move out and in as we’d expect them to.”. .css-1wxds7f{margin-bottom:10px;font-family:nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif;font-weight:700;font-size:0.875rem;line-height:1.25rem;color:#333 !. Important;}.css-2al2sh{font-family:nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif;font-size:0.9375rem;line-height:1.25rem;color:#333;margin-bottom:0.78125rem;margin-top:20px;margin-bottom:5px;font-weight:700;}@media (min-width:740px){.css-2al2sh{font-size:1.0625rem;line-height:1.5rem;margin-bottom:0.9375rem;}}@media (min-width:740px){.css-2al2sh{margin-bottom:10px;}}.css-1yyoic1{font-family:nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif;font-size:0.9375rem;line-height:1.25rem;color:#333;margin-bottom:0.78125rem;}@media (min-width:740px){.css-1yyoic1{font-size:1.0625rem;line-height:1.5rem;margin-bottom:0.9375rem;}}.css-zkk2wn{margin-bottom:20px;font-family:nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif;font-size:0.875rem;line-height:1.5625rem;color:#333;}.css-1dvfdxo{margin:10px auto 0px;font-family:nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif;font-weight:700;font-size:1.125rem;line-height:1.5625rem;color:#121212;}@media (min-width:740px){.css-1dvfdxo{font-size:1.25rem;line-height:1.875rem;}}.css-16ed7iq{width:100%;display:-webkit-box;display:-webkit-flex;display:-ms-flexbox;display:flex;-webkit-align-items:center;-webkit-box-align:center;-ms-flex-align:center;align-items:center;-webkit-box-pack:center;-webkit-justify-content:center;-ms-flex-pack:center;justify-content:center;padding:10px 0;background-color:white;}.css-pmm6ed{display:-webkit-box;display:-webkit-flex;display:-ms-flexbox;display:flex;-webkit-align-items:center;-webkit-box-align:center;-ms-flex-align:center;align-items:center;}.css-pmm6ed > :not(:first-child){margin-left:5px;}.css-5gimkt{font-family:nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif;font-size:0.8125rem;font-weight:700;-webkit-letter-spacing:0.03em;-moz-letter-spacing:0.03em;-ms-letter-spacing:0.03em;letter-spacing:0.03em;text-transform:uppercase;color:#333;}.css-5gimkt:after{content:'Collapse';}.css-rdoyk0{-webkit-transition:all 0.5s ease;transition:all 0.5s ease;-webkit-transform:rotate(180deg);-ms-transform:rotate(180deg);transform:rotate(180deg);}.css-eb027h{max-height:5000px;-webkit-transition:max-height 0.5s ease;transition:max-height 0.5s ease;}.css-6mllg9{-webkit-transition:all 0.5s ease;transition:all 0.5s ease;position:relative;opacity:0;}.css-6mllg9:before{content:'';background-image:linear-gradient(180deg,transparent,#ffffff);background-image:-webkit-linear-gradient(270deg,rgba(255,255,255,0),#ffffff);height:80px;width:100%;position:absolute;bottom:0px;pointer-events:none;}#masthead-bar-one{display:none;}#masthead-bar-one{display:none;}.css-19mumt8{background-color:white;margin:30px 0;padding:0 20px;max-width:510px;}@media (min-width:740px){.css-19mumt8{margin:40px auto;}}.css-19mumt8:focus{outline:1px solid #e2e2e2;}.css-19mumt8 a{color:#326891;-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;border-bottom:2px solid #ccd9e3;}.css-19mumt8 a:visited{color:#333;-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;border-bottom:2px solid #ddd;}.css-19mumt8 a:hover{border-bottom:none;}.css-19mumt8[data-truncated] .css-rdoyk0{-webkit-transform:rotate(0deg);-ms-transform:rotate(0deg);transform:rotate(0deg);}.css-19mumt8[data-truncated] .css-eb027h{max-height:300px;overflow:hidden;-webkit-transition:none;transition:none;}.css-19mumt8[data-truncated] .css-5gimkt:after{content:'See more';}.css-19mumt8[data-truncated] .css-6mllg9{opacity:1;}.css-a8d9oz{border-top:5px solid #121212;border-bottom:2px solid #121212;margin:0 auto;padding:5px 0 0;overflow:hidden;}The Coronavirus Outbreak ›Frequently Asked QuestionsUpdated September 1, 2020Why is it safer to spend time together outside?.

Outdoor gatherings lower risk because wind disperses viral droplets, and sunlight can kill some of the virus. Open spaces prevent the virus from building up in concentrated amounts and being inhaled, which can happen when infected people exhale in a confined space for long stretches of time, said Dr. Julian W.

Tang, a virologist at the University of Leicester.What are the symptoms of coronavirus?. In the beginning, the coronavirus seemed like it was primarily a respiratory illness — many patients had fever and chills, were weak and tired, and coughed a lot, though some people don’t show many symptoms at all. Those who seemed sickest had pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome and received supplemental oxygen.

By now, doctors have identified many more symptoms and syndromes. In April, the C.D.C. Added to the list of early signs sore throat, fever, chills and muscle aches.

Gastrointestinal upset, such as diarrhea and nausea, has also been observed. Another telltale sign of infection may be a sudden, profound diminution of one’s sense of smell and taste. Teenagers and young adults in some cases have developed painful red and purple lesions on their fingers and toes — nicknamed “Covid toe” — but few other serious symptoms.Why does standing six feet away from others help?.

The coronavirus spreads primarily through droplets from your mouth and nose, especially when you cough or sneeze. The C.D.C., one of the organizations using that measure, bases its recommendation of six feet on the idea that most large droplets that people expel when they cough or sneeze will fall to the ground within six feet. But six feet has never been a magic number that guarantees complete protection.

Sneezes, for instance, can launch droplets a lot farther than six feet, according to a recent study. It's a rule of thumb. You should be safest standing six feet apart outside, especially when it's windy.

But keep a mask on at all times, even when you think you’re far enough apart.I have antibodies. Am I now immune?. As of right now, that seems likely, for at least several months.

There have been frightening accounts of people suffering what seems to be a second bout of Covid-19. But experts say these patients may have a drawn-out course of infection, with the virus taking a slow toll weeks to months after initial exposure. People infected with the coronavirus typically produce immune molecules called antibodies, which are protective proteins made in response to an infection.

These antibodies may last in the body only two to three months, which may seem worrisome, but that’s perfectly normal after an acute infection subsides, said Dr. Michael Mina, an immunologist at Harvard University. It may be possible to get the coronavirus again, but it’s highly unlikely that it would be possible in a short window of time from initial infection or make people sicker the second time.What are my rights if I am worried about going back to work?.

Employers have to provide a safe workplace with policies that protect everyone equally. And if one of your co-workers tests positive for the coronavirus, the C.D.C. Has said that employers should tell their employees -- without giving you the sick employee’s name -- that they may have been exposed to the virus.While the study allowed the researchers to compare the relative effectiveness of various masks and face shields, the methods used did not quantify the volume or size of the particles that escaped.The research is unlikely to be the final word on face shields.

A 2014 study has often been cited as evidence that face shields offer extra protection to the person wearing them, but even that study concluded that the benefit was limited. While the face shields protected the wearer from large cough splatters, they were less effective against smaller coughs and aerosols. And after the cough, as larger particles settled to the ground and aerosols dispersed around the room, the face shield reduced aerosol inhalation by only 23 percent.“Face shields can substantially reduce the short-term exposure of health care workers to large infectious aerosol particles, but smaller particles can remain airborne longer and flow around the face shield more easily to be inhaled,” the researchers wrote, adding that for health workers, face shields should be worn in addition to masks, not as a substitute.In Switzerland, health officials warned that a coronavirus outbreak in a hotel appeared to infect workers wearing face shields, while workers wearing traditional masks appeared to have been protected.Dr.

Marr said work in her own lab also shows that face shields offer almost no protection against aerosolized particles believed to play an important role in the spread of illness. €œIt provides maybe 5 percent protection, if that,” she said. €œIt’s almost nothing for the particle sizes we’re concerned about.”While face shields do block large splatters from a cough or sneeze, smaller particles get caught in air flows and never hit the plastic, slipping below it instead.

€œAir can’t pass through the face shield — it has to bend and go around the shield,” Dr. Marr said. €œThe aerosols are going to follow that air flow around the shield.

It’s not going to splat.”For some people, a face shield may still be the best option. For instance, a child with developmental disabilities may be more inclined to use a face shield than a mask. A clear plastic face shield might also be useful to a caregiver who needs to communicate with someone who is hearing impaired.

Although the findings suggest that a cloth or surgical mask offers more protection, experts say that any face covering is better than nothing at all and that face shields will keep some portion of large coughs and sneezes from splattering on the people around them.For most people, a cloth mask of at least two layers, which covers the face from the nose to under the chin, is the best option. A face shield combined with a mask would offer additional protection and may be useful to those who are routinely in contact with other people indoors.“A good homemade mask works very well,” said Dr. Verma.

€œIf it’s comfortable, it can be worn for long periods of time. Definitely try to avoid shields only or masks with valves.”.

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Sumycin
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Biaxin
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500mg
500mg
No
1mg
250mg
Can you get a sample
At cvs
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At cvs
Pharmacy
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21h
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Possible side effects
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As everything slid back levaquin and insulin into focus, I knew, instantly, I wasn't in any danger. Embarrassed from my late-night theatrical display, I dropped off the beam and scurried back to bed. The three of us erupted into laughter from the shock of it all. Experts may disagree on exactly what I experienced, but I have always referred to these sorts of levaquin and insulin episodes as night terrors. Terrors of the Night More than just a nightmare, night terrors are marked by intense panic.

The sufferer will often scream and flail about for a period lasting from a few minutes up to an hour, often startling the people around them. The episodes are more common in children, but an estimated 2 levaquin and insulin percent of the adult population is afflicted as well. I have experienced night terrors (or something similar) my entire life, though they are usually not as dramatic as my cabin episode.After retelling this particular event to California-based sleep physician Kimberly Truong, however, she told me my experience didn't quite fit the night terror definition. “What you're describing kind of blends into two different things,” she says.In a classic night terror, the sufferer doesn't typically remember a dream associated with their actions, she explains. Also, aside from levaquin and insulin some flailing, night terror sufferers tendto stay put.

“More complex behaviors — the climbing — actually leaks into the parasomnia world,” Truong says.Parasomnias are defined as disorders that cause unusual behaviors during sleep. They include night terrors, but sleep walking, sleep talking, sleep eating and even sleep sex are all different forms of parasomnias, too. Sleeping Soundly — Or NotNight terrors are known levaquin and insulin to occur in a stage of sleep known as N3. This is a deep, dreamless sleep that takes place roughly half an hour to an hour after a person falls asleep. This stage of sleep is repeated through the night — but levaquin and insulin the longest period happens during the first sleep cycle, which is why most night terrors occur in the first half of the night.

Children are also known to have more N3 stages, which is why night terrors are more common in youth. From studying brain waves during sleep, doctors know adults who suffer night terrors are experiencing “micro-awakenings” in two sections of the brain, Truong says. One section is levaquin and insulin the motor cortex, which is responsible for movement. The cingulate cortex, which helps regulate emotions, is the other. These little arousals are caused by a variety of factors, from breathing disorders — namely sleep apnea — to psychological issues like anxiety.

Alcohol and other drugs are levaquin and insulin levaquin side effects eyes known to play a role, too. Sleep deprivation can also bring on a night terror, because when the body is overtired it will dip into a replenishing N3 stage quicker and stay there longer, Truong notes. Why So Scared?. Although certain night terror triggers have been identified, there is still so much that has yet to be levaquin and insulin understood — like the best treatment options and why, for some, they even extend into adulthood. It's a source of frustration but also one of intrigue for those studying them.

“There's not a lot in medicine these days where we're still learning a whole lot,” Truong says. “We know so much about the levaquin and insulin heart. We know so much about the brain [and] the lungs on acellular level. But sleep is actually still a big mystery and I find that really fascinating.”Because night terrors are uncommon in adulthood, there can be a stigma attached to them levaquin and insulin. Minnesota resident Shavaughn Ulven is looking to change that.

“My friends make jokes or say 'Oh, it's just a nightmare,' or 'You're growing up, you'll get over it,' ” Ulven says. Ulven, 31, levaquin and insulin has lived with regular night terrors her entire life — experiencing them an average of four nights per week. Typically, they manifest as the classic sit-up-in-bed-and-scream variety. But they can get more involved, too. In one of those levaquin and insulin more memorable episodes, Ulven broke her nose.

“I just ran out of bed, out of the bedroom and instead of hurtling down a hallway, I ran straight into a wall,” she said. “I literally had to wake up my daughter and bring her to the emergency room so I could get my nose set.”In an effort to bring night terror sufferers together, Ulven started a support group on Facebook in 2014. Now boasting more than 500 participants from around the world, levaquin and insulin the group provides a safe space for night terror sufferers to share coping mechanisms, treatment options or simply vent. Ulven herself has been on a variety of doctor-prescribed treatments and therapies forher night terrors, but they haven't gone away. In addition, sleep studies always come up normal because she never manages to experience a night terror when she takes the test.

Today, she copes by sleeping with levaquin and insulin a small light on so she can orient herself more quickly. Her doctors have told her to stay away from medication unless she injures herself again or someone else. Even with all that we don't know, however, Truong and Ulven both urge sufferers to see a doctor about their parasomnias — especially if they're putting themselves in danger. “Some people are waking up in the woods and not even knowing how they got there,” levaquin and insulin Ulven says. “This can be a very serious condition and this can lead to unwanted injuries.

As the ceiling began levaquin pseudomonas coverage crashing down around me, I reached for the hand where can you get levaquin beckoning me from above. I screamed as I attempted to grasp my rescuer's too-distant fingertips, afraid I would be buried alive. When my roommates woke where can you get levaquin me, my heart was still beating rapidly as I gripped the center beam of the cabin we were sharing, my body hanging maybe two feet off the floor.

It was the summer of 2009 and we were at Yosemite for a family reunion — a family I would marry into several years later. I was sharing the space with two other young women I didn't know well and making a terrific impression.As I hung from the ceiling, one of them held my waist while the other turned on the light. As everything slid back where can you get levaquin into focus, I knew, instantly, I wasn't in any danger.

Embarrassed from my late-night theatrical display, I dropped off the beam and scurried back to bed. The three of us erupted into laughter from the shock of it all. Experts may disagree on exactly what I experienced, but I have always referred to these sorts of episodes as night where can you get levaquin terrors.

Terrors of the Night More than just a nightmare, night terrors are marked by intense panic. The sufferer will often scream and flail about for a period lasting from a few minutes up to an hour, often startling the people around them. The episodes are more common in children, but where can you get levaquin an estimated 2 percent of the adult population is afflicted as well.

I have experienced night terrors (or something similar) my entire life, though they are usually not as dramatic as my cabin episode.After retelling this particular event to California-based sleep physician Kimberly Truong, however, she told me my experience didn't quite fit the night terror definition. “What you're describing kind of blends into two different things,” she says.In a classic night terror, the sufferer doesn't typically remember a dream associated with their actions, she explains. Also, aside from some flailing, night terror where can you get levaquin sufferers tendto stay put.

“More complex behaviors — the climbing — actually leaks into the parasomnia world,” Truong says.Parasomnias are defined as disorders that cause unusual behaviors during sleep. They include night terrors, but sleep walking, sleep talking, sleep eating and even sleep sex are all different forms of parasomnias, too. Sleeping Soundly — Or where can you get levaquin NotNight terrors are known to occur in a stage of sleep known as N3.

This is a deep, dreamless sleep that takes place roughly half an hour to an hour after a person falls asleep. This stage of sleep is repeated through the night — but the where can you get levaquin longest period happens during the first sleep cycle, which is why most night terrors occur in the first half of the night. Children are also known to have more N3 stages, which is why night terrors are more common in youth.

From studying brain waves during sleep, doctors know adults who suffer night terrors are experiencing “micro-awakenings” in two sections of the brain, Truong says. One section is where can you get levaquin the motor cortex, which is responsible for movement. The cingulate cortex, which helps regulate emotions, is the other.

These little arousals are caused by a variety of factors, from breathing disorders — namely sleep apnea — to psychological issues like anxiety. Alcohol and levaquin alternative antibiotic other where can you get levaquin drugs are known to play a role, too. Sleep deprivation can also bring on a night terror, because when the body is overtired it will dip into a replenishing N3 stage quicker and stay there longer, Truong notes.

Why So Scared?. Although certain night terror triggers have been identified, there is still where can you get levaquin so much that has yet to be understood — like the best treatment options and why, for some, they even extend into adulthood. It's a source of frustration but also one of intrigue for those studying them.

“There's not a lot in medicine these days where we're still learning a whole lot,” Truong says. “We know where can you get levaquin so much about the heart. We know so much about the brain [and] the lungs on acellular level.

But sleep is actually where can you get levaquin still a big mystery and I find that really fascinating.”Because night terrors are uncommon in adulthood, there can be a stigma attached to them. Minnesota resident Shavaughn Ulven is looking to change that. “My friends make jokes or say 'Oh, it's just a nightmare,' or 'You're growing up, you'll get over it,' ” Ulven says.

Ulven, 31, has lived with regular where can you get levaquin night terrors her entire life — experiencing them an average of four nights per week. Typically, they manifest as the classic sit-up-in-bed-and-scream variety. But they can get more involved, too.

In one of those more where can you get levaquin memorable episodes, Ulven broke her nose. “I just ran out of bed, out of the bedroom and instead of hurtling down a hallway, I ran straight into a wall,” she said. “I literally had to wake up my daughter and bring her to the emergency room so I could get my nose set.”In an effort to bring night terror sufferers together, Ulven started a support group on Facebook in 2014.

Now boasting more than 500 participants from around the world, the group provides a safe where can you get levaquin space for night terror sufferers to share coping mechanisms, treatment options or simply vent. Ulven herself has been on a variety of doctor-prescribed treatments and therapies forher night terrors, but they haven't gone away. In addition, sleep studies always come up normal because she never manages to experience a night terror when she takes the test.

Today, she copes by sleeping with a where can you get levaquin small light on so she can orient herself more quickly. Her doctors have told her to stay away from medication unless she injures herself again or someone else. Even with all that we don't know, however, Truong and Ulven both urge sufferers to see a doctor about their parasomnias — especially if they're putting themselves in danger.

“Some people are waking up in the woods and not even knowing where can you get levaquin how they got there,” Ulven says. “This can be a very serious condition and this can lead to unwanted injuries. This can lead to death.”.

What should I watch for while using Levaquin?

Tell your doctor or health care professional if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse. Drink several glasses of water a day and cut down on drinks that contain caffeine. You must not get dehydrated while taking Levaquin. You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how Levaquin affects you. Do not sit or stand up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Levaquin can make you more sensitive to the sun. Keep out of the sun. If you cannot avoid being in the sun, wear protective clothing and use a sunscreen. Do not use sun lamps or tanning beds/booths. Contact your doctor if you get a sunburn. If you are a diabetic monitor your blood glucose carefully. If you get an unusual reading stop taking Levaquin and call your doctor right away. Do not treat diarrhea with over-the-counter products. Contact your doctor if you have diarrhea that lasts more than 2 days or if the diarrhea is severe and watery. Avoid antacids, calcium, iron, and zinc products for 4 hours before and 2 hours after taking a dose of Levaquin.

How long does levaquin stay in your body

Artificial intelligence technologies are being increasingly relied upon how long does levaquin stay in your body in the healthcare domain, particularly when it comes to decision support, precision medicine, and http://voiture-et-handicap.fr/levaquin-500mg-tablet-price/ the improvement of the quality of care. Regarding primary care how long does levaquin stay in your body specifically, AI also represents an opportunity to assist with electronic health record documentation. A new study published in the Journal of American Medical Informatics Association this week shows that, although AI documentation assistants (or digital scribes) offer great potential in the primary care setting, they will need to be supervised by a human until strong evidence is available for their autonomous potential. In workshops how long does levaquin stay in your body with primary care doctors, wrote researchers from the Australian Institute of Health Innovation, "There was consensus that consultations of the future would increasingly involve more automated and AI-supported systems.

However, there were differing views on how this human-AI collaboration would work, what roles doctors and AI would take, and what tasks could be delegated to AI." HIMSS20 Digital Learn on-demand, earn credit, find products and solutions. Get Started how long does levaquin stay in your body >>. WHY IT MATTERS Researchers worked with primary care doctors who use EHRs regularly for documentation purposes to understand their views on future AI documentation assistants. They identified three major themes that emerged from the how long does levaquin stay in your body discussions.

Professional autonomy, human-AI collaboration and new models of care. First, the doctors emphasized the importance of their ability to care for patients in their own way with the abilities AI technology provided."If they [patients] think that we're how long does levaquin stay in your body just getting suggestions from a computer, then maybe they can just get suggestions from a computer. I think it becomes more difficult to convince them that our recommendations are more valuable than what they can pick up on the internet," said one physician. They noted the need for a bottom-up approach to technology development, with a focus on delivering clear benefits to practice and workflow, and expressed fears how long does levaquin stay in your body around potential legal complications that could stem from working with an AI assistant.With regard to human-AI collaboration, doctors expressed a variety of viewpoints about what tasks could be delegated to AI.

Many believed that an AI system could assist with tasks such as documentation, referrals and other paperwork. Most said that AI how long does levaquin stay in your body systems would lack empathy. "GPs voiced several concerns, including some potential biases in patient data and system design, the time needed to fix the errors and train the system, challenges of dealing with complex cases, and the auditing of AI," wrote the researchers. However, doctors also discussed how AI could help how long does levaquin stay in your body with emerging models of primary care, including preconsultation, mobile health and telehealth.

THE LARGER TREND The question of reducing EHR-related clinician burnout has loomed large, with vendors and researchers trying to pinpoint major causes – and, in turn, potential solutions. AI has been raised as one such solution, with several major EHR how long does levaquin stay in your body vendors offering plans for incorporating the technology into their workflows. But human input remains vital, as the new JAMIA study and other research has noted. AI could "bring back meaning and purpose how long does levaquin stay in your body in the practice of medicine while providing new levels of efficiency and accuracy," wrote Stanford researchers in a 2017 Journal of the American Medical Association study.

But, they continued, physicians must "proactively guide, oversee, and monitor the adoption of artificial intelligence as a partner in patient care."ON THE RECORD"AI documentation assistants will likely ... Be integral how long does levaquin stay in your body to the future primary care consultations. However, these technologies will still need to be supervised by a human until strong evidence for reliable autonomous performance is available. Therefore, different human-AI collaboration models will need to be designed and evaluated to ensure patient safety, quality of how long does levaquin stay in your body care, doctor safety, and doctor autonomy," wrote the Australian Institute for Health Innovation researchers.

Kat Jercich is senior editor of Healthcare IT News.Twitter. @kjercichHealthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas will pay $500,000 to settle a whistleblower case that alleged its Viztek electronic health record how long does levaquin stay in your body subsidiary had falsified data for certification tests.WHY IT MATTERSIn the qui tam complaint, filed in 2017 in U.S. District Court in New Jersey – where Konica Minolta is based – was filed by whistleblower Leighsa Wilson, who worked for two years at Viztek, best known for its PACS and imaging technologies, as a project manager for its EXA EHR product.In mid-2015, the complaint alleges, Viztek, which was in negotiations to be acquired by Konica Minolta, worked together with InfoGard Laboratories (which was then an ONC-authorized certification and testing body) to make false representations that the EHR software complied with requirements for certification – and qualified for receipt of incentive payments under the federal meaningful use program."To ensure that their product was certified and that their customers received incentive payments, Viztek and Konica Minolta. (a) falsely attested to InfoGard how long does levaquin stay in your body that their software met the certification criteria.

(b) hard-coded their software to pass certification testing requirements temporarily without ensuring that the software released to customers met certification criteria. And (c) caused their users to falsely attest to using a certified EHR technology, when their software could not support the applicable certification criteria in the field," according to the complaint, which also alleges that InfoGard "facilitated and how long does levaquin stay in your body participated in" these false attestations, "knowingly or with reckless disregard," certifying the EHR software despite its inability to meet ONC's certification criteria.The flaws in Viztek's software "not only rendered the system unreliable and unable to meet meaningful use standards, but the flaws also created a risk to patient health and safety. Rather than spend the time and resources necessary to correct the flaws in its EHR software, the EHR defendants opted to do nothing."THE LARGER TRENDThis is only the most recent settlement of this type from health IT vendors accused of False Claims Act violations, of course.Most notable, was the case of eClinicalWorks, which was alleged by the Department of Justice to have falsely claimed meaningful use certification, to have neglected to have safety addressed issues in its software and to have paid kickbacks to clients. That case was settled in 2017 for $155 million.More recently, similar complaints how long does levaquin stay in your body were lodged against companies such as Practice Fusion and Greenway Health.

They settled with DOJ for $145 million and $57 million, respectively."We will be unflagging in our efforts to preserve the accuracy and reliability of Americans’ health records and guard the public against corporate greed," said U.S. Attorney for the District of Vermont Christina Nolan after the Greenway case this past year how long does levaquin stay in your body. "EHR companies should consider themselves on notice."ON THE RECORD"The lives of patients depend upon the information processed by electronic health records," said Wilson – who, as a qui tam whistleblower will receive 20% of the financial settlement – in a statement. "Functionality testing and subsequent certification must be performed and obtained through a reliable, measurable process.""Filing a qui tam lawsuit is a powerful and effective way to report problems with EHR software purchased how long does levaquin stay in your body with federal funds and get the problems fixed when they are ignored," said Luke Diamond, an associate at Phillips &.

Cohen. "The False Claims Act protects whistleblowers from job retaliation and offers rewards if the government recovers funds as a result of the qui tam case.""Our client was concerned about possible patient harm that can occur if EHR software isn't properly certified, so she stepped forward to inform how long does levaquin stay in your body the government about what she had witnessed," said Colette Matzzie, a partner and whistleblower attorney with Phillips &. Cohen, which brought the case. "Ensuring that EHR software meets all governmental requirements is important to safeguard both patient care and federal funds."The Arc Madison Cortland how long does levaquin stay in your body in Oneida, New York, knows that there is a lack of providers that specialize in the intellectual/developmental disability field.

Making the problem worse, not so many that understand dual diagnosis.THE PROBLEMWith COVID-19 minimizing the ability for individuals to receive face-to-face services with their providers, many patients are resorting to emergency department visits.Additionally, The Arc is how long does levaquin stay in your body in a rural area requiring travel to see a provider, and there is a lack of providers in the field this page. The population itself is underserved, with a lack of transportation to get to appointments. Without the ability to institute how long does levaquin stay in your body telemedicine as a solution to these problems, the population supported by The Arc would have seen a lengthy (permanent?. ) pause for needed medical services.PROPOSALThe Arc this year received funding from the FCC to help provide telehealth services.“With this funding we can further treat patients, reduce crisis and allow for social distancing, which is imperative to our vulnerable population,” said Jackie Fahey, director of clinic services at The Arc Madison Cortland.

€œWe could provide ongoing services to the how long does levaquin stay in your body individuals we serve to ensure there are no unnecessary emergency department visits. This places less of a strain on our local emergency departments and unneeded additional costs.”With the purchase of tablets and headsets and telehealth services from vendor Doxy.me, The Arc was able to still provide medical care to its population of people with an I/DD. Additionally, eliminating emergency department visits also eliminates their exposure to COVID-19 and eases the burden of the ED providers how long does levaquin stay in your body who are overburdened right now.MARKETPLACEThere are many vendors of telemedicine technology and services on the health IT market today. Healthcare IT News recently compiled a comprehensive list of these vendors with detailed descriptions.

To read this how long does levaquin stay in your body special report, click here.MEETING THE CHALLENGE“When all of our locations were closed abruptly in the middle of March due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we needed to determine a way to quickly and easily implement a telehealth solution so that we were able to still support the individuals that we serve during the crisis, especially when many were under strict quarantine protocols for a variety of reasons,” Fahey explained.“We signed up immediately for the Doxy.me telehealth platform as it was a user-friendly platform that is HIPAA-compliant. The feature we liked about Doxy.me was that it is web-based, so nothing had to be downloaded and it could easily be used on a laptop, tablet or smartphone.”The Arc rolled out the technology initially with its mental health providers, who offer psychiatry/medication monitoring services, social work counseling and mental health counseling. More than half the organization’s enrollment is enrolled in one or all of these three services, so it was able to continue providing services to a large number of enrolled individuals.“We then began to roll the telehealth services out to nutrition, speech therapy, physical therapy and occupational therapy caseloads if individuals were appropriate to receive the service through telehealth,” Fahey said.RESULTSThe first success metric how long does levaquin stay in your body The Arc has been able to achieve with the technology is maintaining its utilization for mental health services. When everything was running normal prior to COVID-19, The Arc’s mental health services made up about 25% of the services it provided on a monthly basis.

With the implementation of telehealth services during the COVID-19 pandemic, the organization was able to achieve 20% of the services provided on a monthly basis.This has shown to staff that they have been able to still serve and respond to the needs of their psychiatry, social work and mental health counseling patients with minimal issues by implementing the telehealth technology.“The second success metric we have how long does levaquin stay in your body been able to achieve with the technology is we have been able to continue to receive referrals for our services and enroll new individuals into the services they need if the services are able to be completed via telehealth,” she said. €œBetween April, May and June, we have enrolled 16 new individuals into ongoing clinic services, which is right on par for our normal enrollment average per month.”USING FCC AWARD FUNDSThe Arc Madison Cortland was awarded $49,455 by the FCC earlier this year for laptop computers and headsets to provide remote consultations and treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic for psychological services, counseling, and occupational and physical therapy for people with developmental and other disabilities.“With the funds, we purchased headsets and tablets to allow the people we support to have access to medical appointments, along with physical therapy, occupational therapy and psychology appointments remotely,” Fahey explained. €œThe technology enables us to continue to provide these services at a time when the people we support are unable to leave for traditional in-person appointments.“Because these are such uncertain times, and a time frame for when we may return to how long does levaquin stay in your body ‘normalcy’ is unknown, the technology allows us to continue delivering medical support without the concern of a pause in those services.”Twitter. @SiwickiHealthITEmail the writer.

Bill.siwicki@himss.orgHealthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.HIMSSCast host Jonah Comstock convenes a how long does levaquin stay in your body panel of HIMSS Media editors – HITN Senior Editor Kat Jercich, MobiHealthNews Associate Editor Dave Muoio and HFN Associate Editor Jeff Lagasse – to discuss recent delivery slowdowns at the Post Office and how they have and haven't affected healthcare stakeholders, including startups and patients. The team also looks into the broader trend of the politicization of traditionally apolitical government agencies and how that could affect public faith in COVID-19 treatments or vaccines.More about this episode:USPS service delays are hitting some mail-order pharmacies and telehealth platforms harder than othersMail delays may affect medication supply for nearly 1 in 4 Americans over 50Postmaster General Louis DeJoy's full testimony (C-SPAN)The Package Coalition homepageThe Trump administration this week asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse a lower court ruling that allowed for mail-order and telemedicine how long does levaquin stay in your body abortion during the COVID-19 crisis. U.S.

Food and Drug Administration regulations require mifepristone, which is used in medication abortion, to be dispensed at a how long does levaquin stay in your body clinic, hospital or medical office. In June, U.S. District Judge for the District of Maryland Theodore Chuang blocked the requirements during the pandemic, finding them to be a "substantial obstacle." Mifepristone, in how long does levaquin stay in your body combination with misoprostol, is FDA-approved for abortions up to ten weeks' gestation. In 2017, a New England Journal of Medicine article argued against the FDA regulations for mifepristone given the drug's safety record.

WHY how long does levaquin stay in your body IT MATTERS Acting Solicitor General Jeffrey B. Wall applied for a stay of Chuang's injunction on Wednesday as the case makes its way through the lower courts, arguing that the regulations do not represent an undue burden. "The safety how long does levaquin stay in your body requirements here concern only medication abortions using Mifeprex, which is approved for use only during the first ten weeks of pregnancy. They have no effect on the availability of surgical abortions, a method that this Court has treated as safe for women," wrote Wall.

Reproductive rights groups spoke out against the move, noting that people of color are disproportionately affected both by abortion restrictions and by the COVID-19 how long does levaquin stay in your body pandemic. "Black, Brown, Indigenous people and people of color are already dying/getting sick at disproportionate rates from COVID-19," said All Above All* on Twitter. "The Trump-Pence admin is trying to make this worse by asking SCOTUS to require people face unnecessary risk just to get abortion care." "The FDA’s in-person requirements on mifepristone subject patients to unnecessary how long does levaquin stay in your body exposure to a deadly virus, and two federal courts have already rejected the Trump administration’s argument. Forcing patients to travel to a health center to access the safe, effective medication they need especially hurts people of color and people with low-incomes, who already face more barriers to care," said Planned Parenthood Federation of America President and CEO Alexis McGill-Johnson in a statement.THE LARGER TREND The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated many existing barriers to care, including for reproductive health services.

"We’ve seen the undue burden and hardship these restrictions create during COVID-19, especially in how long does levaquin stay in your body communities hit hardest by the pandemic," said Skye Perryman, chief legal officer at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, a co-plaintiff in the telemedicine case, to Healthcare IT News. In response to the July ruling, some abortion providers reportedly moved to delivering mifepristone by mail. Still, others faced how long does levaquin stay in your body state laws that restricted the provision of abortion via telemedicine.And as Dr. Jacquelyn Yeh from Physicians from Reproductive Health pointed out in July, telemedicine itself involves hurdles such as broadband access and privacy concerns.

It remains to be seen whether how long does levaquin stay in your body the Supreme Court will grant the Trump administration's request. ON THE RECORD "As COVID-19 ravages Black, Latino, Indigenous, and other communities of color across the country, the Trump administration should be aiming to keep us healthy – not moving forward with an agenda to endanger people who seek abortion," said McGill-Johnson. Kat Jercich is senior editor of Healthcare IT News.Twitter. @kjercichHealthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication..

Artificial intelligence where can you get levaquin technologies are being increasingly relied upon in the healthcare domain, particularly when it comes to decision support, precision medicine, and the improvement levaquin alternative antibiotic of the quality of care. Regarding primary care specifically, AI also represents an opportunity to assist where can you get levaquin with electronic health record documentation. A new study published in the Journal of American Medical Informatics Association this week shows that, although AI documentation assistants (or digital scribes) offer great potential in the primary care setting, they will need to be supervised by a human until strong evidence is available for their autonomous potential. In workshops with primary care doctors, wrote researchers from the Australian Institute of Health Innovation, "There was consensus that consultations of the future would increasingly involve where can you get levaquin more automated and AI-supported systems.

However, there were differing views on how this human-AI collaboration would work, what roles doctors and AI would take, and what tasks could be delegated to AI." HIMSS20 Digital Learn on-demand, earn credit, find products and solutions. Get Started >> where can you get levaquin. WHY IT MATTERS Researchers worked with primary care doctors who use EHRs regularly for documentation purposes to understand their views on future AI documentation assistants. They identified three major themes that where can you get levaquin emerged from the discussions.

Professional autonomy, human-AI collaboration and new models of care. First, the doctors emphasized the importance of their ability to care for patients in their own way with the abilities AI technology provided."If they [patients] think that we're just getting suggestions from a computer, then maybe they can just get suggestions from where can you get levaquin a computer. I think it becomes more difficult to convince them that our recommendations are more valuable than what they can pick up on the internet," said one physician. They noted the need for a bottom-up approach to technology development, with a focus on delivering clear benefits to practice and workflow, and expressed fears around potential legal where can you get levaquin complications that could stem from working with an AI assistant.With regard to human-AI collaboration, doctors expressed a variety of viewpoints about what tasks could be delegated to AI.

Many believed that an AI system could assist with tasks such as documentation, referrals and other paperwork. Most said that AI systems would where can you get levaquin lack empathy. "GPs voiced several concerns, including some potential biases in patient data and system design, the time needed to fix the errors and train the system, challenges of dealing with complex cases, and the auditing of AI," wrote the researchers. However, doctors also discussed how AI could where can you get levaquin help with emerging models of primary care, including preconsultation, mobile health and telehealth.

THE LARGER TREND The question of reducing EHR-related clinician burnout has loomed large, with vendors and researchers trying to pinpoint major causes – and, in turn, potential solutions. AI has been raised as one such solution, with several major where can you get levaquin EHR vendors offering plans for incorporating the technology into their workflows. But human input remains vital, as the new JAMIA study and other research has noted. AI could "bring back meaning and purpose in the practice of medicine while providing new levels of efficiency and accuracy," wrote Stanford researchers in a 2017 Journal of where can you get levaquin the American Medical Association study.

But, they continued, physicians must "proactively guide, oversee, and monitor the adoption of artificial intelligence as a partner in patient care."ON THE RECORD"AI documentation assistants will likely ... Be integral where can you get levaquin to the future primary care consultations. However, these technologies will still need to be supervised by a human until strong evidence for reliable autonomous performance is available. Therefore, different human-AI collaboration models will need to where can you get levaquin be designed and evaluated to ensure patient safety, quality of care, doctor safety, and doctor autonomy," wrote the Australian Institute for Health Innovation researchers.

Kat Jercich is senior editor of Healthcare IT News.Twitter. @kjercichHealthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas will pay $500,000 to settle a whistleblower case that alleged its Viztek electronic health record subsidiary had falsified data for where can you get levaquin certification tests.WHY IT MATTERSIn the qui tam complaint, filed in 2017 in U.S. District Court in New Jersey – where Konica Minolta is based – was filed by whistleblower Leighsa Wilson, who worked for two years at Viztek, best known for its PACS and imaging technologies, as a project manager for its EXA EHR product.In mid-2015, the complaint alleges, Viztek, which was in negotiations to be acquired by Konica Minolta, worked together with InfoGard Laboratories (which was then an ONC-authorized certification and testing body) to make false representations that the EHR software complied with requirements for certification – and qualified for receipt of incentive payments under the federal meaningful use program."To ensure that their product was certified and that their customers received incentive payments, Viztek and Konica Minolta. (a) falsely attested to InfoGard where can you get levaquin that their software met the certification criteria.

(b) hard-coded their software to pass certification testing requirements temporarily without ensuring that the software released to customers met certification criteria. And (c) caused their users to falsely attest to using a certified EHR technology, when their software could not support the applicable certification criteria in the field," according where can you get levaquin to the complaint, which also alleges that InfoGard "facilitated and participated in" these false attestations, "knowingly or with reckless disregard," certifying the EHR software despite its inability to meet ONC's certification criteria.The flaws in Viztek's software "not only rendered the system unreliable and unable to meet meaningful use standards, but the flaws also created a risk to patient health and safety. Rather than spend the time and resources necessary to correct the flaws in its EHR software, the EHR defendants opted to do nothing."THE LARGER TRENDThis is only the most recent settlement of this type from health IT vendors accused of False Claims Act violations, of course.Most notable, was the case of eClinicalWorks, which was alleged by the Department of Justice to have falsely claimed meaningful use certification, to have neglected to have safety addressed issues in its software and to have paid kickbacks to clients. That case was settled in 2017 for $155 million.More recently, similar complaints were lodged against where can you get levaquin companies such as Practice Fusion and Greenway Health.

They settled with DOJ for $145 million and $57 million, respectively."We will be unflagging in our efforts to preserve the accuracy and reliability of Americans’ health records and guard the public against corporate greed," said U.S. Attorney for where can you get levaquin the District of Vermont Christina Nolan after the Greenway case this past year. "EHR companies should consider themselves on notice."ON THE RECORD"The lives of patients depend upon the information processed by electronic health records," said Wilson – who, as a qui tam whistleblower will receive 20% of the financial settlement – in a statement. "Functionality testing and subsequent certification must be performed and obtained through a reliable, measurable process.""Filing a qui tam lawsuit is a powerful and effective way to report problems with EHR software purchased with federal funds and get the problems fixed when they are ignored," said Luke where can you get levaquin Diamond, an associate at Phillips &.

Cohen. "The False Claims Act protects whistleblowers from job retaliation and offers rewards if the government recovers funds as a result of the qui tam case.""Our client was concerned about where can you get levaquin possible patient harm that can occur if EHR software isn't properly certified, so she stepped forward to inform the government about what she had witnessed," said Colette Matzzie, a partner and whistleblower attorney with Phillips &. Cohen, which brought the case. "Ensuring that EHR software meets all governmental requirements is important to safeguard both patient care where can you get levaquin and federal funds."The Arc Madison Cortland in Oneida, New York, knows that there is a lack of providers that specialize in the intellectual/developmental disability field.

Making the problem worse, not so many that understand dual diagnosis.THE PROBLEMWith COVID-19 minimizing the ability for individuals to receive face-to-face services with their providers, many patients are resorting to emergency department visits.Additionally, The Arc is in a rural area how long does levaquin stay in your body requiring travel to see a provider, and there is a lack of providers where can you get levaquin in the field. The population itself is underserved, with a lack of transportation to get to appointments. Without the ability to institute telemedicine where can you get levaquin as a solution to these problems, the population supported by The Arc would have seen a lengthy (permanent?. ) pause for needed medical services.PROPOSALThe Arc this year received funding from the FCC to help provide telehealth services.“With this funding we can further treat patients, reduce crisis and allow for social distancing, which is imperative to our vulnerable population,” said Jackie Fahey, director of clinic services at The Arc Madison Cortland.

€œWe could provide ongoing services to the individuals we serve to ensure there are no unnecessary emergency department where can you get levaquin visits. This places less of a strain on our local emergency departments and unneeded additional costs.”With the purchase of tablets and headsets and telehealth services from vendor Doxy.me, The Arc was able to still provide medical care to its population of people with an I/DD. Additionally, eliminating emergency department visits also eliminates their exposure to COVID-19 and eases the burden of the ED providers who are overburdened right where can you get levaquin now.MARKETPLACEThere are many vendors of telemedicine technology and services on the health IT market today. Healthcare IT News recently compiled a comprehensive list of these vendors with detailed descriptions.

To read this special report, click here.MEETING THE CHALLENGE“When all of our locations were closed abruptly in the middle of March due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we needed to determine a way to quickly and easily implement a telehealth solution so that we were able to still support the individuals that we serve where can you get levaquin during the crisis, especially when many were under strict quarantine protocols for a variety of reasons,” Fahey explained.“We signed up immediately for the Doxy.me telehealth platform as it was a user-friendly platform that is HIPAA-compliant. The feature we liked about Doxy.me was that it is web-based, so nothing had to be downloaded and it could easily be used on a laptop, tablet or smartphone.”The Arc rolled out the technology initially with its mental health providers, who offer psychiatry/medication monitoring services, social work counseling and mental health counseling. More than half the organization’s enrollment is enrolled in one or all of these where can you get levaquin three services, so it was able to continue providing services to a large number of enrolled individuals.“We then began to roll the telehealth services out to nutrition, speech therapy, physical therapy and occupational therapy caseloads if individuals were appropriate to receive the service through telehealth,” Fahey said.RESULTSThe first success metric The Arc has been able to achieve with the technology is maintaining its utilization for mental health services. When everything was running normal prior to COVID-19, The Arc’s mental health services made up about 25% of the services it provided on a monthly basis.

With the implementation of telehealth services during the COVID-19 pandemic, the organization was able to achieve 20% of the services provided on a monthly basis.This has shown to staff that they have been able to still serve and respond to the needs of where can you get levaquin their psychiatry, social work and mental health counseling patients with minimal issues by implementing the telehealth technology.“The second success metric we have been able to achieve with the technology is we have been able to continue to receive referrals for our services and enroll new individuals into the services they need if the services are able to be completed via telehealth,” she said. €œBetween April, May and June, we have enrolled 16 new individuals into ongoing clinic services, which is right on par for our normal enrollment average per month.”USING FCC AWARD FUNDSThe Arc Madison Cortland was awarded $49,455 by the FCC earlier this year for laptop computers and headsets to provide remote consultations and treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic for psychological services, counseling, and occupational and physical therapy for people with developmental and other disabilities.“With the funds, we purchased headsets and tablets to allow the people we support to have access to medical appointments, along with physical therapy, occupational therapy and psychology appointments remotely,” Fahey explained. €œThe technology enables us to continue to provide these services at a time when the people we support are unable to leave for traditional in-person appointments.“Because these are such uncertain times, and a where can you get levaquin time frame for when we may return to ‘normalcy’ is unknown, the technology allows us to continue delivering medical support without the concern of a pause in those services.”Twitter. @SiwickiHealthITEmail the writer.

Bill.siwicki@himss.orgHealthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.HIMSSCast host Jonah Comstock convenes a panel of HIMSS Media editors – HITN Senior Editor Kat Jercich, MobiHealthNews Associate Editor Dave Muoio and HFN Associate Editor Jeff Lagasse – to discuss recent delivery slowdowns at the Post Office where can you get levaquin and how they have and haven't affected healthcare stakeholders, including startups and patients. The team also looks into the broader trend of the politicization of traditionally apolitical government agencies and how that could affect public faith in COVID-19 treatments or vaccines.More about this episode:USPS service delays are hitting some mail-order pharmacies and telehealth platforms harder than othersMail delays may affect medication supply for nearly 1 in 4 Americans over 50Postmaster General Louis DeJoy's full testimony (C-SPAN)The Package Coalition homepageThe Trump administration this week asked the U.S. Supreme Court where can you get levaquin to reverse a lower court ruling that allowed for mail-order and telemedicine abortion during the COVID-19 crisis. U.S.

Food and where can you get levaquin Drug Administration regulations require mifepristone, which is used in medication abortion, to be dispensed at a clinic, hospital or medical office. In June, U.S. District Judge for the District of Maryland Theodore Chuang blocked the requirements during the pandemic, finding them to be a "substantial obstacle." Mifepristone, in combination with misoprostol, is FDA-approved for abortions up to ten weeks' gestation where can you get levaquin. In 2017, a New England Journal of Medicine article argued against the FDA regulations for mifepristone given the drug's safety record.

WHY IT MATTERS where can you get levaquin Acting Solicitor General Jeffrey B. Wall applied for a stay of Chuang's injunction on Wednesday as the case makes its way through the lower courts, arguing that the regulations do not represent an undue burden. "The safety requirements here concern only medication abortions using Mifeprex, which is approved for use only during the first ten weeks of pregnancy where can you get levaquin. They have no effect on the availability of surgical abortions, a method that this Court has treated as safe for women," wrote Wall.

Reproductive rights groups spoke out against the move, noting that people of where can you get levaquin color are disproportionately affected both by abortion restrictions and by the COVID-19 pandemic. "Black, Brown, Indigenous people and people of color are already dying/getting sick at disproportionate rates from COVID-19," said All Above All* on Twitter. "The Trump-Pence admin is trying to make this worse by asking where can you get levaquin SCOTUS to require people face unnecessary risk just to get abortion care." "The FDA’s in-person requirements on mifepristone subject patients to unnecessary exposure to a deadly virus, and two federal courts have already rejected the Trump administration’s argument. Forcing patients to travel to a health center to access the safe, effective medication they need especially hurts people of color and people with low-incomes, who already face more barriers to care," said Planned Parenthood Federation of America President and CEO Alexis McGill-Johnson in a statement.THE LARGER TREND The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated many existing barriers to care, including for reproductive health services.

"We’ve seen the undue burden and hardship these restrictions create during COVID-19, especially in communities hit hardest by the pandemic," said Skye Perryman, chief legal officer at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, a where can you get levaquin co-plaintiff in the telemedicine case, to Healthcare IT News. In response to the July ruling, some abortion providers reportedly moved to delivering mifepristone by mail. Still, where can you get levaquin others faced state laws that restricted the provision of abortion via telemedicine.And as Dr. Jacquelyn Yeh from Physicians from Reproductive Health pointed out in July, telemedicine itself involves hurdles such as broadband access and privacy concerns.

It remains to be seen whether the Supreme where can you get levaquin Court will grant the Trump administration's request. ON THE RECORD "As COVID-19 ravages Black, Latino, Indigenous, and other communities of color across the country, the Trump administration should be aiming to keep us healthy – not moving forward with an agenda to endanger people who seek abortion," said McGill-Johnson. Kat Jercich is where can you get levaquin senior editor of Healthcare IT News.Twitter. @kjercichHealthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication..

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Patients needing follow-up care will be referred to their primary care provider or other health care provider.Para conmemorar el Mes de Concientización sobre el Cáncer de Mama, UC Davis Health está ofreciendo exámenes de mamografía para cumplir con las necesidades de miembros de la comunidad que no cuentan con seguro médico. UC Davis Health está ofreciendo mamografías sin costo alguno el 17 y 31 de octubreLos exámenes sin costo son para mujeres mayores de los 40 años quienes no tienen where can you get levaquin seguro médico, y quienes no tienen síntomas presentes. (Mujeres con síntomas necesitan un diferente tipo de mamografía, el cual es conocido como una mamografía de diagnóstico.)Citas están disponibles para dos sábados durante el mes de octubre. El 17 y el 31, desde where can you get levaquin las 7:15 a.m.

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NCHS Data levaquin price usa you can try this out Brief No. 286, September 2017PDF Versionpdf icon (374 KB)Anjel Vahratian, Ph.D.Key findingsData from the National Health Interview Survey, 2015Among those aged 40–59, perimenopausal women (56.0%) were more likely than postmenopausal (40.5%) and premenopausal (32.5%) women to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period.Postmenopausal women aged 40–59 were more likely than premenopausal women aged 40–59 to have trouble falling asleep (27.1% compared with 16.8%, respectively), and staying asleep (35.9% compared with 23.7%), four times or more in the past week.Postmenopausal women aged 40–59 (55.1%) were more likely than premenopausal women aged 40–59 (47.0%) to not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week.Sleep duration and quality are important contributors to health and wellness. Insufficient sleep is associated with levaquin price usa an increased risk for chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease (1) and diabetes (2).

Women may be particularly vulnerable to sleep problems during times of reproductive hormonal change, such as after the menopausal transition. Menopause is levaquin price usa “the permanent cessation of menstruation that occurs after the loss of ovarian activity” (3). This data brief describes sleep duration and sleep quality among nonpregnant women aged 40–59 by menopausal status.

The age range selected for this analysis reflects the focus on midlife sleep health. In this levaquin price usa analysis, 74.2% of women are premenopausal, 3.7% are perimenopausal, and 22.1% are postmenopausal. Keywords.

Insufficient sleep, menopause, National Health Interview Survey Perimenopausal women were more likely than premenopausal and postmenopausal women to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period.More than one in three nonpregnant women aged 40–59 levaquin price usa slept less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period (35.1%) (Figure 1). Perimenopausal women were most likely to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period (56.0%), compared with 32.5% of premenopausal and 40.5% of postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women were significantly more likely than premenopausal women to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period.

Figure 1 levaquin price usa. Percentage of nonpregnant women aged 40–59 who slept less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period, by menopausal status. United States, 2015image icon1Significant quadratic levaquin price usa trend by menopausal status (p <.

0.05).NOTES. Women were postmenopausal if they had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries. Women were perimenopausal levaquin price usa if they no longer had a menstrual cycle and their last menstrual cycle was 1 year ago or less.

Women were premenopausal if they still had a menstrual cycle. Access data table for Figure 1pdf icon.SOURCE levaquin price usa. NCHS, National Health Interview Survey, 2015.

The percentage of women aged 40–59 levaquin price usa who had trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week varied by menopausal status.Nearly one in five nonpregnant women aged 40–59 had trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week (19.4%) (Figure 2). The percentage of women in this age group who had trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week increased from 16.8% among premenopausal women to 24.7% among perimenopausal and 27.1% among postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women were significantly more likely than premenopausal women to have trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week.

Figure 2 levaquin price usa. Percentage of nonpregnant women aged 40–59 who had trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week, by menopausal status. United States, 2015image icon1Significant linear trend by menopausal levaquin price usa status (p <.

0.05).NOTES. Women were postmenopausal if they had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries. Women were perimenopausal if they no longer had a menstrual cycle and their last menstrual levaquin price usa cycle was 1 year ago or less.

Women were premenopausal if they still had a menstrual cycle. Access data table for Figure 2pdf levaquin price usa icon.SOURCE. NCHS, National Health Interview Survey, 2015.

The percentage of women aged 40–59 who had trouble staying asleep four times or more levaquin price usa in the past week varied by menopausal status.More than one in four nonpregnant women aged 40–59 had trouble staying asleep four times or more in the past week (26.7%) (Figure 3). The percentage of women aged 40–59 who had trouble staying asleep four times or more in the past week increased from 23.7% among premenopausal, to 30.8% among perimenopausal, and to 35.9% among postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women were significantly more likely than premenopausal women to have trouble staying asleep four times or more in the past week.

Figure 3 levaquin price usa. Percentage of nonpregnant women aged 40–59 who had trouble staying asleep four times or more in the past week, by menopausal status. United States, 2015image icon1Significant linear trend by levaquin price usa menopausal status (p <.

0.05).NOTES. Women were postmenopausal if they had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries. Women were perimenopausal if they no longer had a menstrual cycle and their last menstrual cycle was levaquin price usa 1 year ago or less.

Women were premenopausal if they still had a menstrual cycle. Access data levaquin price usa table for Figure 3pdf icon.SOURCE. NCHS, National Health Interview Survey, 2015.

The percentage of women aged 40–59 who did not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week varied by menopausal status.Nearly one in two nonpregnant women aged 40–59 did not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week (48.9%) (Figure 4). The percentage of women in this age group who did not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more levaquin price usa in the past week increased from 47.0% among premenopausal women to 49.9% among perimenopausal and 55.1% among postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women were significantly more likely than premenopausal women to not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week.

Figure 4 levaquin price usa. Percentage of nonpregnant women aged 40–59 who did not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week, by menopausal status. United States, 2015image icon1Significant linear trend by menopausal status (p <.

0.05).NOTES. Women were postmenopausal if they had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries. Women were perimenopausal if they no longer had a menstrual cycle and their last menstrual cycle was 1 year ago or less.

Women were premenopausal if they still had a menstrual cycle. Access data table for Figure 4pdf icon.SOURCE. NCHS, National Health Interview Survey, 2015.

SummaryThis report describes sleep duration and sleep quality among U.S. Nonpregnant women aged 40–59 by menopausal status. Perimenopausal women were most likely to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period compared with premenopausal and postmenopausal women.

In contrast, postmenopausal women were most likely to have poor-quality sleep. A greater percentage of postmenopausal women had frequent trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, and not waking well rested compared with premenopausal women. The percentage of perimenopausal women with poor-quality sleep was between the percentages for the other two groups in all three categories.

Sleep duration changes with advancing age (4), but sleep duration and quality are also influenced by concurrent changes in women’s reproductive hormone levels (5). Because sleep is critical for optimal health and well-being (6), the findings in this report highlight areas for further research and targeted health promotion. DefinitionsMenopausal status.

A three-level categorical variable was created from a series of questions that asked women. 1) “How old were you when your periods or menstrual cycles started?. € http://voiture-et-handicap.fr/levaquin-500mg-tablet-price/.

2) “Do you still have periods or menstrual cycles?. €. 3) “When did you have your last period or menstrual cycle?.

€. And 4) “Have you ever had both ovaries removed, either as part of a hysterectomy or as one or more separate surgeries?. € Women were postmenopausal if they a) had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or b) were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries.

Women were perimenopausal if they a) no longer had a menstrual cycle and b) their last menstrual cycle was 1 year ago or less. Premenopausal women still had a menstrual cycle.Not waking feeling well rested. Determined by respondents who answered 3 days or less on the questionnaire item asking, “In the past week, on how many days did you wake up feeling well rested?.

€Short sleep duration. Determined by respondents who answered 6 hours or less on the questionnaire item asking, “On average, how many hours of sleep do you get in a 24-hour period?. €Trouble falling asleep.

Determined by respondents who answered four times or more on the questionnaire item asking, “In the past week, how many times did you have trouble falling asleep?. €Trouble staying asleep. Determined by respondents who answered four times or more on the questionnaire item asking, “In the past week, how many times did you have trouble staying asleep?.

€ Data source and methodsData from the 2015 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were used for this analysis. NHIS is a multipurpose health survey conducted continuously throughout the year by the National Center for Health Statistics. Interviews are conducted in person in respondents’ homes, but follow-ups to complete interviews may be conducted over the telephone.

Data for this analysis came from the Sample Adult core and cancer supplement sections of the 2015 NHIS. For more information about NHIS, including the questionnaire, visit the NHIS website.All analyses used weights to produce national estimates. Estimates on sleep duration and quality in this report are nationally representative of the civilian, noninstitutionalized nonpregnant female population aged 40–59 living in households across the United States.

The sample design is described in more detail elsewhere (7). Point estimates and their estimated variances were calculated using SUDAAN software (8) to account for the complex sample design of NHIS. Linear and quadratic trend tests of the estimated proportions across menopausal status were tested in SUDAAN via PROC DESCRIPT using the POLY option.

Differences between percentages were evaluated using two-sided significance tests at the 0.05 level. About the authorAnjel Vahratian is with the National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Interview Statistics. The author gratefully acknowledges the assistance of Lindsey Black in the preparation of this report.

ReferencesFord ES. Habitual sleep duration and predicted 10-year cardiovascular risk using the pooled cohort risk equations among US adults. J Am Heart Assoc 3(6):e001454.

2014.Ford ES, Wheaton AG, Chapman DP, Li C, Perry GS, Croft JB. Associations between self-reported sleep duration and sleeping disorder with concentrations of fasting and 2-h glucose, insulin, and glycosylated hemoglobin among adults without diagnosed diabetes. J Diabetes 6(4):338–50.

2014.American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 141.

Management of menopausal symptoms. Obstet Gynecol 123(1):202–16. 2014.Black LI, Nugent CN, Adams PF.

Tables of adult health behaviors, sleep. National Health Interview Survey, 2011–2014pdf icon. 2016.Santoro N.

Perimenopause. From research to practice. J Women’s Health (Larchmt) 25(4):332–9.

2016.Watson NF, Badr MS, Belenky G, Bliwise DL, Buxton OM, Buysse D, et al. Recommended amount of sleep for a healthy adult. A joint consensus statement of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and Sleep Research Society.

J Clin Sleep Med 11(6):591–2. 2015.Parsons VL, Moriarity C, Jonas K, et al. Design and estimation for the National Health Interview Survey, 2006–2015.

National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 2(165). 2014.RTI International.

SUDAAN (Release 11.0.0) [computer software]. 2012. Suggested citationVahratian A.

Sleep duration and quality among women aged 40–59, by menopausal status. NCHS data brief, no 286. Hyattsville, MD.

National Center for Health Statistics. 2017.Copyright informationAll material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission. Citation as to source, however, is appreciated.National Center for Health StatisticsCharles J.

Rothwell, M.S., M.B.A., DirectorJennifer H. Madans, Ph.D., Associate Director for ScienceDivision of Health Interview StatisticsMarcie L. Cynamon, DirectorStephen J.

Blumberg, Ph.D., Associate Director for Science.

NCHS Data Brief No where can you get levaquin. 286, September 2017PDF Versionpdf icon (374 KB)Anjel Vahratian, Ph.D.Key findingsData from the National Health Interview Survey, 2015Among those aged 40–59, perimenopausal women (56.0%) were more likely than postmenopausal (40.5%) and premenopausal (32.5%) women to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period.Postmenopausal women aged 40–59 were more likely than premenopausal women aged 40–59 to have trouble falling asleep (27.1% compared with 16.8%, respectively), and staying asleep (35.9% compared with 23.7%), four times or more in the past week.Postmenopausal women aged 40–59 (55.1%) were more likely than premenopausal women aged 40–59 (47.0%) to not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week.Sleep duration and quality are important contributors to health and wellness. Insufficient sleep is associated with an increased risk for chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease where can you get levaquin (1) and diabetes (2). Women may be particularly vulnerable to sleep problems during times of reproductive hormonal change, such as after the menopausal transition.

Menopause is “the permanent cessation of menstruation that occurs after the loss where can you get levaquin of ovarian activity” (3). This data brief describes sleep duration and sleep quality among nonpregnant women aged 40–59 by menopausal status. The age range selected for this analysis reflects the focus on midlife sleep health. In this analysis, 74.2% of women are premenopausal, 3.7% are perimenopausal, and 22.1% are where can you get levaquin postmenopausal.

Keywords. Insufficient sleep, menopause, National Health Interview Survey Perimenopausal women were more likely than where can you get levaquin premenopausal and postmenopausal women to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period.More than one in three nonpregnant women aged 40–59 slept less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period (35.1%) (Figure 1). Perimenopausal women were most likely to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period (56.0%), compared with 32.5% of premenopausal and 40.5% of postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women were significantly more likely than premenopausal women to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period.

Figure 1 where can you get levaquin. Percentage of nonpregnant women aged 40–59 who slept less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period, by menopausal status. United States, 2015image icon1Significant where can you get levaquin quadratic trend by menopausal status (p <. 0.05).NOTES.

Women were postmenopausal if they had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries. Women were perimenopausal if they no longer had a menstrual cycle and their last menstrual cycle was 1 year where can you get levaquin ago or less. Women were premenopausal if they still had a menstrual cycle. Access data table for Figure 1pdf where can you get levaquin icon.SOURCE.

NCHS, National Health Interview Survey, 2015. The percentage of women aged 40–59 who had trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week varied by menopausal status.Nearly one in five where can you get levaquin nonpregnant women aged 40–59 had trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week (19.4%) (Figure 2). The percentage of women in this age group who had trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week increased from 16.8% among premenopausal women to 24.7% among perimenopausal and 27.1% among postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women were significantly more likely than premenopausal women to have trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week.

Figure 2 where can you get levaquin. Percentage of nonpregnant women aged 40–59 who had trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week, by menopausal status. United States, where can you get levaquin 2015image icon1Significant linear trend by menopausal status (p <. 0.05).NOTES.

Women were postmenopausal if they had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries. Women were perimenopausal if they no longer had a menstrual cycle and their where can you get levaquin last menstrual cycle was 1 year ago or less. Women were premenopausal if they still had a menstrual cycle. Access data where can you get levaquin table for Figure 2pdf icon.SOURCE.

NCHS, National Health Interview Survey, 2015. The percentage where can you get levaquin of women aged 40–59 who had trouble staying asleep four times or more in the past week varied by menopausal status.More than one in four nonpregnant women aged 40–59 had trouble staying asleep four times or more in the past week (26.7%) (Figure 3). The percentage of women aged 40–59 who had trouble staying asleep four times or more in the past week increased from 23.7% among premenopausal, to 30.8% among perimenopausal, and to 35.9% among postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women were significantly more likely than premenopausal women to have trouble staying asleep four times or more in the past week.

Figure 3 where can you get levaquin. Percentage of nonpregnant women aged 40–59 who had trouble staying asleep four times or more in the past week, by menopausal status. United States, 2015image icon1Significant linear trend by menopausal status (p where can you get levaquin <. 0.05).NOTES.

Women were postmenopausal if they had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries. Women were perimenopausal if they no longer had a menstrual cycle and their where can you get levaquin last menstrual cycle was 1 year ago or less. Women were premenopausal if they still had a menstrual cycle. Access data table for Figure where can you get levaquin 3pdf icon.SOURCE.

NCHS, National Health Interview Survey, 2015. The percentage of women aged 40–59 who did not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week varied by menopausal status.Nearly one in two nonpregnant women aged 40–59 did not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week (48.9%) (Figure 4). The percentage of women in this age group who where can you get levaquin did not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week increased from 47.0% among premenopausal women to 49.9% among perimenopausal and 55.1% among postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women were significantly more likely than premenopausal women to not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week.

Figure 4 where can you get levaquin. Percentage of nonpregnant women aged 40–59 who did not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week, by menopausal status. United States, 2015image icon1Significant linear trend by menopausal status (p <. 0.05).NOTES.

Women were postmenopausal if they had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries. Women were perimenopausal if they no longer had a menstrual cycle and their last menstrual cycle was 1 year ago or less. Women were premenopausal if they still had a menstrual cycle. Access data table for Figure 4pdf icon.SOURCE.

NCHS, National Health Interview Survey, 2015. SummaryThis report describes sleep duration and sleep quality among U.S. Nonpregnant women aged 40–59 by menopausal status. Perimenopausal women were most likely to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period compared with premenopausal and postmenopausal women.

In contrast, postmenopausal women were most likely to have poor-quality sleep. A greater percentage of postmenopausal women had frequent trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, and not waking well rested compared with premenopausal women. The percentage of perimenopausal women with poor-quality sleep was between the percentages for the other two groups in all three categories. Sleep duration changes with advancing age (4), but sleep duration and quality are also influenced by concurrent changes in women’s reproductive hormone levels (5).

Because sleep is critical for optimal health and well-being (6), the findings in this report highlight areas for further research and targeted health promotion. DefinitionsMenopausal status. A three-level categorical variable was created from a series of questions that asked women. 1) “How old were you when your periods or menstrual cycles started?.

€. 2) “Do you still have periods or menstrual cycles?. €. 3) “When did you have your last period or menstrual cycle?.

€. And 4) “Have you ever had both ovaries removed, either as part of a hysterectomy or as one or more separate surgeries?. € Women were postmenopausal if they a) had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or b) were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries. Women were perimenopausal if they a) no longer had a menstrual cycle and b) their last menstrual cycle was 1 year ago or less.

Premenopausal women still had a menstrual cycle.Not waking feeling well rested. Determined by respondents who answered 3 days or less on the questionnaire item asking, “In the past week, on how many days did you wake up feeling well rested?. €Short sleep duration. Determined by respondents who answered 6 hours or less on the questionnaire item asking, “On average, how many hours of sleep do you get in a 24-hour period?.

€Trouble falling asleep. Determined by respondents who answered four times or more on the questionnaire item asking, “In the past week, how many times did you have trouble falling asleep?. €Trouble staying asleep. Determined by respondents who answered four times or more on the questionnaire item asking, “In the past week, how many times did you have trouble staying asleep?.

€ Data source and methodsData from the 2015 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were used for this analysis. NHIS is a multipurpose health survey conducted continuously throughout the year by the National Center for Health Statistics. Interviews are conducted in person in respondents’ homes, but follow-ups to complete interviews may be conducted over the telephone. Data for this analysis came from the Sample Adult core and cancer supplement sections of the 2015 NHIS.

For more information about NHIS, including the questionnaire, visit the NHIS website.All analyses used weights to produce national estimates. Estimates on sleep duration and quality in this report are nationally representative of the civilian, noninstitutionalized nonpregnant female population aged 40–59 living in households across the United States. The sample design is described in more detail elsewhere (7). Point estimates and their estimated variances were calculated using SUDAAN software (8) to account for the complex sample design of NHIS.

Linear and quadratic trend tests of the estimated proportions across menopausal status were tested in SUDAAN via PROC DESCRIPT using the POLY option. Differences between percentages were evaluated using two-sided significance tests at the 0.05 level. About the authorAnjel Vahratian is with the National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Interview Statistics. The author gratefully acknowledges the assistance of Lindsey Black in the preparation of this report.

ReferencesFord ES. Habitual sleep duration and predicted 10-year cardiovascular risk using the pooled cohort risk equations among US adults. J Am Heart Assoc 3(6):e001454. 2014.Ford ES, Wheaton AG, Chapman DP, Li C, Perry GS, Croft JB.

Associations between self-reported sleep duration and sleeping disorder with concentrations of fasting and 2-h glucose, insulin, and glycosylated hemoglobin among adults without diagnosed diabetes. J Diabetes 6(4):338–50. 2014.American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. ACOG Practice Bulletin No.

141. Management of menopausal symptoms. Obstet Gynecol 123(1):202–16. 2014.Black LI, Nugent CN, Adams PF.

Tables of adult health behaviors, sleep. National Health Interview Survey, 2011–2014pdf icon. 2016.Santoro N. Perimenopause.

From research to practice. J Women’s Health (Larchmt) 25(4):332–9. 2016.Watson NF, Badr MS, Belenky G, Bliwise DL, Buxton OM, Buysse D, et al. Recommended amount of sleep for a healthy adult.

A joint consensus statement of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and Sleep Research Society. J Clin Sleep Med 11(6):591–2. 2015.Parsons VL, Moriarity C, Jonas K, et al. Design and estimation for the National Health Interview Survey, 2006–2015.

National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 2(165). 2014.RTI International. SUDAAN (Release 11.0.0) [computer software].

2012. Suggested citationVahratian A. Sleep duration and quality among women aged 40–59, by menopausal status. NCHS data brief, no 286.

Hyattsville, MD. National Center for Health Statistics. 2017.Copyright informationAll material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission. Citation as to source, however, is appreciated.National Center for Health StatisticsCharles J.

Rothwell, M.S., M.B.A., DirectorJennifer H. Madans, Ph.D., Associate Director for ScienceDivision of Health Interview StatisticsMarcie L. Cynamon, DirectorStephen J. Blumberg, Ph.D., Associate Director for Science.

Does levaquin have penicillin

IntroductionIn recent years, many studies levaquin alternative antibiotic have been published on new diagnostic possibilities and management approaches in cohorts of patients suspected to have a disorder/difference of sex development (DSD).1–13 Based on these studies, it has become clear that services and institutions still differ in the composition of the multidisciplinary teams that provide care for does levaquin have penicillin patients who have a DSD.11 14 Several projects have now worked to resolve this variability in care. The European Cooperation in Science and Technology (EU COST) action BM1303 ‘A systematic elucidation does levaquin have penicillin of differences of sex development’ has been a platform to achieve European agreement on harmonisation of clinical management and laboratory practices.15–17 Another such initiative involved an update of the 2006 DSD consensus document by an international group of professionals and patient representatives.18 These initiatives have highlighted how cultural and financial aspects and the availability of resources differ significantly between countries and societies, a situation that hampers supranational agreement on common diagnostic protocols. As only a few national guidelines have been published in international journals, comparison of these guidelines is difficult even though such a comparison is necessary to capture the differences and initiate actions to overcome them.

Nonetheless, four DSD (expert) centres located in the Netherlands and Flanders (the Dutch-speaking Northern part of Belgium) have collaborated to produce a detailed guideline on diagnostics in DSD.19 This shows that a supranational guideline does levaquin have penicillin can be a reasonable approach for countries with similarly structured healthcare systems and similar resources. Within the guideline there is agreement that optimisation of expertise and care can be achieved through centralisation, for example, by limiting analysis of next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based diagnostic panels to only a few centres and by centralising pathological review of gonadal tissues. International networks such as the European Reference Network for rare endocrine conditions (EndoERN), in which DSD is embedded, may facilitate the expansion of this kind of collaboration across Europe.This paper highlights key discussion points in the Dutch-Flemish guideline that have been insufficiently addressed in the literature thus far because they reflect evolving technologies or less visible does levaquin have penicillin stakeholders.

For example, prenatal observation of an atypical aspect of the genitalia indicating a possible DSD is becoming increasingly common, and we discuss appropriate counselling and a diagnostic approach for these cases, including the option of using NGS-based genetic testing. So far, little attention has been paid to this process.20 21 Furthermore, informing patients and/or their parents about atypical sex development and why this may warrant referral to a specialised team may be challenging, especially for professionals with limited experience in DSD.22 23 Therefore, a section does levaquin have penicillin of the Dutch-Flemish guideline was written for these healthcare providers. Moreover, this enables DSD specialists to refer to the guideline when advising a referral.

Transition from does levaquin have penicillin the prenatal to the postnatal team and from the paediatric to the adult team requires optimal communication between the specialists involved. Application of NGS-based techniques may lead to a higher diagnostic yield, providing a molecular genetic diagnosis in previously unsolved cases.16 We address the timing of this testing and the problems associated with this technique such as the interpretation of variants of unknown clinical significance (VUS). Similarly, histopathological interpretation and classification of removed gonadal tissue is challenging and would benefit from international collaboration and centralisation of expertise.MethodsFor the guideline revision, an interdisciplinary multicentre group was formed with all members responsible for updating the literature for a specific part of the does levaquin have penicillin guideline.

Literature search in PubMed was not systematic, but rather intended to be broad in order to cover all areas and follow expert opinions. This approach is more in line with the Clinical Practice Advisory Document method described by Burke et al24 for guidelines involving genetic practice because it is often troublesome to substantiate such guidelines with sufficient evidence due to the rapid changes in testing methods, for does levaquin have penicillin example, gene panels. All input provided by the group was synthesised by the chairperson (YvB), who also reviewed abstracts of papers on DSD published between 2010 and September 2017 for the guideline and up to October 2019 for this paper.

Abstracts had to be written in English and were identified using a broad range of Medical Subject Headings terms (eg, does levaquin have penicillin DSD, genetic, review, diagnosis, diagnostics, 46,XX DSD, 46,XY DSD, guideline, multidisciplinary care). Next, potentially relevant papers on diagnostic procedures in DSD were selected. Case reports does levaquin have penicillin were excluded, as were articles that were not open access or retrievable through institutional access.

Based on this, a draft guideline was produced that was in line with the international principles of good diagnostic care in DSD. This draft was discussed by the writing committee and, after having obtained agreement on remaining points does levaquin have penicillin of discussion, revised into a final draft. This version was sent to a broad group of professionals from academic centres and DSD teams whose members had volunteered to review the draft guideline.

After receiving and incorporating their input, the final version was presented to the does levaquin have penicillin paediatric and genetic associations for approval. After approval by the members of the paediatric (NVK), clinical genetic (VKGN) and genetic laboratory (VKGL) associations, the guideline was published on their respective websites.19 Although Turner syndrome and Klinefelter syndrome are considered to be part of the DSD spectrum, they are not extensively discussed in this diagnostic guideline as guidelines dedicated to these syndromes already exist.25 26 However, some individuals with Turner syndrome or Klinefelter syndrome may present with ambiguous or atypical genitalia and may therefore initially follow the DSD diagnostic process.Guideline highlightsPrenatal settingPresentationThe most frequent prenatal presentation of a DSD condition is atypical genitalia found on prenatal ultrasound as an isolated finding or in combination with other structural anomalies. This usually occurs after the 20-week routine medical ultrasound for screening of congenital anomalies, but may also occur earlier, for example, when a commercial ultrasound is performed at the request of the parents.Another way DSD can be diagnosed before birth is when invasive prenatal genetic testing does levaquin have penicillin carried out for a different reason, for example, due to suspicion of other structural anomalies, reveals a discrepancy between the genotypic sex and the phenotypic sex seen by ultrasound.

In certified laboratories, the possibility of a sample switch is extremely low but should be ruled out immediately. More often, the discrepancy will be due to sex-chromosome mosaicism or a true form of DSD.A does levaquin have penicillin situation now occurring with increasing frequency is a discrepancy between the genotypic sex revealed by non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT), which is now available to high-risk pregnant women in the Netherlands and to all pregnant women in Belgium, and later ultrasound findings. NIPT screens for CNVs in the fetus.

However, depending on legal restrictions and/or ethical considerations, the X does levaquin have penicillin and Y chromosomes are not always included in NIPT analysis and reports. If the X and Y chromosomes are included, it is important to realise that the presence of a Y-chromosome does not necessarily imply male fetal development. At the time that NIPT is performed (usually 11–13 does levaquin have penicillin weeks), genital development cannot be reliably appreciated by ultrasound, so any discrepancy or atypical aspect of the genitalia will only be noticed later in pregnancy and should prompt further evaluation.Counselling and diagnosticsIf a DSD is suspected, first-line sonographers and obstetricians should refer the couple to their colleague prenatal specialists working with or in a DSD team.

After confirming an atypical genital on ultrasound, the specialist team should offer the couple a referral for genetic counselling to discuss the possibility of performing invasive prenatal testing (usually an amniocentesis) to identify an underlying cause that fits the ultrasound findings.22 23 To enable the parents to make a well-informed decision, prenatal counselling should, in our opinion, include. Information on does levaquin have penicillin the ultrasound findings and the limitations of this technique. The procedure(s) that can be followed, including the risks associated with an amniocentesis.

And the does levaquin have penicillin type of information genetic testing can and cannot provide. Knowing which information has been provided and what words have been used by the prenatal specialist is very helpful for those involved in postnatal care.It is important that parents understand that the biological sex of a baby is determined by a complex interplay of chromosomes, genes and hormones, and thus that assessment of the presence or absence of a Y-chromosome alone is insufficient to assign the sex of their unborn child or, as in any unborn child, say anything about the child’s future gender identity.Expecting parents can be counselled by the clinical geneticist and the psychologist from the DSD team, although other DSD specialists can also be involved. The clinical geneticist should be experienced in prenatal counselling and well informed about the diagnostic possibilities given the limited time span in which test results need to be available to allow parents to make a well-informed decision about whether or does levaquin have penicillin not to continue the pregnancy.

Termination of pregnancy can be considered, for instance, in a syndromic form of DSD with multiple malformations, but when the DSD occurs as an apparently isolated condition, expecting parents may also consider termination of pregnancy, which, does levaquin have penicillin although considered controversial by some, is legal in Belgium and the Netherlands. The psychologist of the DSD team can support parents during and after pregnancy and help them cope with feelings of uncertainty and eventual considerations of a termination of pregnancy, as well as with practical issues, for example, how to inform others. The stress of not does levaquin have penicillin knowing exactly what the child’s genitalia will look like and uncertainty about the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis cannot be avoided completely.

Parents are informed that if the postnatal phenotype is different from what was prenatally expected, the advice given about diagnostic testing can be adjusted accordingly, for example, if a hypospadias is milder than was expected based on prenatal ultrasound images. In our experience, parents appreciate having already spoken to some members of the DSD team during pregnancy and having a contact person before birth.After expert prenatal counselling, a significant number of pregnant couples decline prenatal does levaquin have penicillin testing (personal experience IALG, MK, ABD, YvB, MC and HC-vdG). At birth, umbilical cord blood is a good source for (molecular) karyotyping and storage of DNA and can be obtained by the obstetrician, midwife or neonatologist.

The terminology used in communication with parents should be carefully chosen,22 23 and midwives and staff of neonatal and delivery units should be clearly instructed to use gender-neutral and non-stigmatising vocabulary (eg, ‘your baby’) as long as does levaquin have penicillin sex assignment is pending.An algorithm for diagnostic evaluation of a suspected DSD in the prenatal situation is proposed in figure 1. When couples opt for invasive prenatal diagnosis, the genetic analysis usually involves an (SNP)-array. It was recently estimated that >30% of individuals who have a DSD have additional structural anomalies, with does levaquin have penicillin cardiac and neurological anomalies and fetal growth restriction being particularly common.27 28 If additional anomalies are seen, the geneticist can consider specific gene defects that may underlie a known genetic syndrome or carry out NGS.

NGS-based techniques have also now made their appearance in prenatal diagnosis of congenital anomalies.29 30 Panels using these techniques can be specific for genes involved in DSD, or be larger panels covering multiple congenital anomalies, and are usually employed with trio-analysis to compare variants identified in the child with the parents’ genetics.29–31 Finding a genetic cause before delivery can help reduce parental stress in the neonatal period and speed up decisions regarding gender assignment. In such cases there is no tight time limit, and we propose completing the analysis well before the expected delivery.Disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the prenatal setting does levaquin have penicillin. A diagnostic algorithm.

*SOX9. Upstream anomalies and balanced translocations at promotor sites!. Conventional karyotyping can be useful.

NGS, next-generation sequencing." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 1 Disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the prenatal setting. A diagnostic algorithm. *SOX9.

Upstream anomalies and balanced translocations at promotor sites!. Conventional karyotyping can be useful. NGS, next-generation sequencing.First contact by a professional less experienced in DSDWhereas most current guidelines start from the point when an individual has been referred to the DSD team,1 15 the Dutch-Flemish guideline dedicates a chapter to healthcare professionals less experienced in DSD as they are often the first to suspect or identify such a condition.

Apart from the paper of Indyk,7 little guidance is available for these professionals about how to act in such a situation. The chapter in the Dutch-Flemish guideline summarises the various clinical presentations that a DSD can have and provides information on how to communicate with parents and/or patients about the findings of the physical examination, the first-line investigations and the need for prompt referral to a specialised centre for further evaluation. Clinical examples are offered to illustrate some of these recurring situations.

The medical issues in DSD can be very challenging, and the social and psychological impact is high. For neonates with ambiguous genitalia, sex assignment is an urgent and crucial issue, and it is mandatory that parents are informed that it is possible to postpone registration of their child’s sex. In cases where sex assignment has already taken place, the message that the development of the gonads or genitalia is still atypical is complicated and distressing for patients and parents or carers.

A list of contact details for DSD centres and patient organisations in the Netherlands and Flanders is attached to the Dutch-Flemish guideline. Publishing such a list, either in guidelines or online, can help healthcare professionals find the nearest centres for consultations and provide patients and patient organisations with an overview of the centres where expertise is available.Timing and place of genetic testing using NGS-based gene panelsThe diagnostic workup that is proposed for 46,XX and 46,XY DSD is shown in figures 2 and 3, respectively. Even with the rapidly expanding molecular possibilities, a (family) history and a physical examination remain the essential first steps in the diagnostic process.

Biochemical and hormonal screening aim at investigating serum electrolytes, renal function and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axes. Ultrasound screening of kidneys and internal genitalia, as well as establishing genotypic sex, should be accomplished within 48 hours and complete the baseline diagnostic work-up of a child born with ambiguous genitalia.1 16 32 3346,XX disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the postnatal setting. A diagnostic algorithm.

NGS, next-generation sequencing. CAH, Congenital adrenal hyperplasia. AMH, Anti-Müllerian Hormone." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 2 46,XX disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the postnatal setting.

A diagnostic algorithm. NGS, next-generation sequencing. CAH, Congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

AMH, Anti-Müllerian Hormone.46,XY disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the postnatal setting. A diagnostic algorithm. * SOX9.

Upstream anomalies and balanced translocations at promotor sites!. Conventional karyotyping can be useful. NGS, next-generation sequencing." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 3 46,XY disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the postnatal setting.

A diagnostic algorithm. *SOX9. Upstream anomalies and balanced translocations at promotor sites!.

Conventional karyotyping can be useful. NGS, next-generation sequencing.Very recently, a European position paper has been published focusing on the genetic workup of DSD.16 It highlights the limitations and drawbacks of NGS-based tests, which include the chance of missing subtle structural variants such as CNVs and mosaicism and the fact that NGS cannot detect methylation defects or other epigenetic changes.16 28 31 Targeted DNA analysis is preferred in cases where hormonal investigations suggest a block in steroidogenesis (eg, 11-β-hydroxylase deficiency, 21-hydroxylase deficiency), or in the context of a specific clinical constellation such as the often coincidental finding of Müllerian structures in a boy with normal external genitalia or cryptorchidism, that is, persistent Müllerian duct syndrome.33 34 Alternative tests should also be considered depending on the available information. Sometimes, a simple mouth swab for FISH analysis can detect mosaic XY/X in a male with hypospadias or asymmetric gonadal development or in a female with little or no Turner syndrome stigmata and a normal male molecular karyotyping profile or peripheral blood karyotype.

Such targeted testing avoids incidental findings and is cheaper and faster than analysis of a large NGS-based panel, although the cost difference is rapidly declining.However, due to the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of DSD conditions, the most cost-effective next steps in the majority of cases are whole exome sequencing followed by panel analysis of genes involved in genital development and function or trio-analysis of a large gene panel (such as a Mendeliome).16 35–38 Pretest genetic counselling involves discussing what kind of information will be reported to patients or parents and the chance of detecting VUS, and the small risk of incidental findings when analysing a DSD panel should be mentioned. Laboratories also differ in what class of variants they report.39 In our experience, the fear of incidental findings is a major reason why some parents refrain from genetic testing.Timing of the DSD gene panel analysis is also important. While some patients or parents prefer that all diagnostic procedures be performed as soon as possible, others need time to reflect on the complex information related to more extensive genetic testing and on its possible consequences.

If parents or patients do not consent to panel-based genetic testing, analysis of specific genes, such as WT1, should be considered when appropriate in view of the clinical consequences if a mutation is present (eg, clinical surveillance of renal function and screening for Wilms’ tumour in the case of WT1 mutations). Genes that are more frequently involved in DSD (eg, SRY, NR5A1) and that match the specific clinical and hormonal features in a given patient could also be considered for sequencing. Targeted gene analysis may also be preferred in centres located in countries that do not have the resources or technical requirements to perform NGS panel-based genetic testing.

Alternatively, participation by these centres in international collaborative networks may allow them to outsource the molecular genetic workup abroad.Gene panels differ between centres and are regularly updated based on scientific progress. A comparison of DSD gene panels used in recent studies can be found at https://www.nature.com/articles/s41574-018-0010-8%23Sec46.15 The panels currently used at the coauthors’ institutions can be found on their respective websites. Given the pace of change, it is important to regularly consider repeating analysis in patients with an unexplained DSD, for example, when they transition into adult care or when they move from one centre to another.

This also applies to patients in whom a clinical diagnosis has never been genetically confirmed. Confusion may arise when the diagnosis cannot be confirmed or when a mutation is identified in a different gene, for example, NR5A1 in someone with a clinical diagnosis of CAIS that has other consequences for relatives. Hence, new genetic counselling should always accompany new diagnostic endeavours.Class 3 variants and histopathological examinationsThe rapidly evolving diagnostic possibilities raise new questions.

What do laboratories report?. How should we deal with the frequent findings of mainly unique VUS or class 3 variants (ACMG recommendation) in the many different DSD-related genes in the diagnostic setting?. Reporting VUS can be a source of uncertainty for parents, but not reporting these variants precludes further investigations to determine their possible pathogenicity.

It can also be difficult to prove variant pathogenicity, both on gene-level and variant-level.39 Moreover, given the gonad-specific expression of some genes and the variable phenotypic spectrum and reduced penetrance, segregation analysis is not always informative. A class 3 variant that does not fit the clinical presentation may be unrelated to the observed phenotype, but it could also represent a newly emerging phenotype. This was recently demonstrated by the identification of the NR5A1 mutation, R92W, in individuals with 46,XX testicular and ovotesticular DSD.40 This gene had previously been associated with 46,XY DSD.

In diagnostic laboratories, there is usually no capacity or expertise to conduct large-scale functional studies to determine pathogenicity of these unique class 3 VUS in the different genes involved in DSD. Functional validation of variants identified in novel genes may be more attractive in a research context. However, for individual families with VUS in well-established DSD genes such as AR or HSD17B3, functional analysis may provide a confirmed diagnosis that implies for relatives the option of undergoing their own DNA analysis and estimating the genetic risk of their own future offspring.

This makes genetic follow-up important in these cases and demonstrates the usefulness of international databases and networks and the centralisation of functional studies of genetic variants in order to reduce costs and maximise expertise.The same is true for histopathological description, germ-cell tumour risk assessment in specific forms of DSD and classification of gonadal samples. Germ-cell tumour risk is related to the type of DSD (among other factors), but it is impossible to make risk estimates in individual cases.41–44 Gonadectomy may be indicated in cases with high-risk dysgenetic abdominal gonads that cannot be brought into a stable superficial (ie, inguinal, labioscrotal) position that allows clinical or radiological surveillance, or to avoid virilisation due to 5-alpha reductase deficiency in a 46,XY girl with a stable female gender identity.45 Pathological examination of DSD gonads requires specific expertise. For example, the differentiation between benign germ cell abnormalities, such as delayed maturation and (pre)malignant development of germ cells, is crucial for clinical management but can be very troublesome.46 Centralised pathological examination of gonadal biopsy and gonadectomy samples in one centre, or a restricted number of centres, on a national scale can help to overcome the problem of non-uniform classification and has proven feasible in the Netherlands and Belgium.

We therefore believe that uniform assessment and classification of gonadal differentiation patterns should also be addressed in guidelines on DSD management.International databases of gonadal tissues are crucial for learning more about the risk of malignancy in different forms of DSD, but they are only reliable if uniform criteria for histological classification are strictly applied.46 These criteria could be incorporated in many existing networks such as the I-DSD consortium, the Disorders of Sex Development Translational Research Network, the European Reference Network on Urogenital Diseases (eUROGEN), the EndoERN and COST actions.15–17 47Communication at the transition from paediatric to adult carePaediatric and adult teams need to collaborate closely to facilitate a well-organised transition from paediatric to adult specialist care.15 48–50 Both teams need to exchange information optimally and should consider transition as a longitudinal process rather than a fixed moment in time. Age-appropriate information is key at all ages, and an overview of topics to be discussed at each stage is described by Cools et al.15 Table 1 shows an example of how transition can be organised.View this table:Table 1 Example of transition table as used in the DSD clinic of the Erasmus Medical CenterPsychological support and the continued provision of information remains important for individuals with a DSD at all ages.15 22 In addition to the information given by the DSD team members, families and patients can benefit from resources such as support groups and information available on the internet.47 Information available online should be checked for accuracy and completeness when referring patients and parents to internet sites.Recommendations for future actionsMost guidelines and articles on the diagnosis and management of DSD are aimed at specialists and are only published in specialist journals or on websites for endocrinologists, urologists or geneticists. Yet there is a need for guidelines directed towards first-line and second-line healthcare workers that summarise the recommendations about the first crucial steps in the management of DSD.

These should be published in widely available general medical journals and online, along with a national list of DSD centres. Furthermore, DSD (expert) centres should provide continuous education to all those who may be involved in the identification of individuals with a DSD in order to enable these healthcare professionals to recognise atypical genitalia, to promptly refer individuals who have a DSD and to inform the patient and parents about this and subsequent diagnostic procedures.As DSD continues to be a rare condition, it will take time to evaluate the effects of having such a guideline on the preparedness of first-line and second-line healthcare workers to recognise DSD conditions. One way to evaluate this might be the development and use of questionnaires asking patients, carers and families and referring physicians how satisfied they were with the initial medical consultation and referral and what could be improved.

A helpful addition to existing international databases that collect information on genetic variations would be a list of centres that offer suitable functional studies for certain genes, ideally covering the most frequently mutated genes (at minimum).Patient organisations can also play an important role in informing patients about newly available diagnostic or therapeutic strategies and options, and their influence and specific role has now been recognised and discussed in several publications.17 47 However, it should be kept in mind that these organisations do not represent all patients, as a substantial number of patients and parents are not member of such an organisation.Professionals have to provide optimal medical care based on well-established evidence, or at least on broad consensus. Yet not everything can be regulated by recommendations and guidelines. Options, ideas and wishes should be openly discussed between professionals, patients and families within their confidential relationship.

This will enable highly individualised holistic care tailored to the patient’s needs and expectations. Once they are well-informed of all available options, parents and/or patients can choose what they consider the optimal care for their children or themselves.15 16ConclusionThe Dutch-Flemish guideline uniquely addresses some topics that are under-represented in the literature, thus adding some key aspects to those addressed in recent consensus papers and guidelines.15–17 33 47As more children with a DSD are now being identified prenatally, and the literature on prenatal diagnosis of DSD remains scarce,20 21 we propose a prenatal diagnostic algorithm and emphasise the importance of having a prenatal specialist involved in or collaborating with DSD (expert) centres.We also stress that good communication between all involved parties is essential. Professionals should be well informed about protocols and communication.

Collaboration between centres is necessary to optimise aspects of care such as uniform interpretation of gonadal pathology and functional testing of class 3 variants found by genetic testing. Guidelines can provide a framework within which individualised patient care should be discussed with all stakeholders.AcknowledgmentsThe authors would like to thank the colleagues of the DSD teams for their input in and critical reading of the Dutch-Flemish guideline. Amsterdam University Center (AMC and VU), Maastricht University Medical Center, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, Radboud University Medical Center Nijmegen, University Medical Center Groningen, University Medical Center Utrecht, Ghent University Hospital.

The authors would like to thank Kate McIntyre for editing the revised manuscript and Tom de Vries Lentsch for providing the figures as a PDF. Three of the authors of this publication are members of the European Reference Network for rare endocrine diseases—Project ID 739543.IntroductionEndometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological malignancy in the developed world.1 Its incidence has risen over the last two decades as a consequence of the ageing population, fewer hysterectomies for benign disease and the obesity epidemic. In the USA, it is estimated that women have a 1 in 35 lifetime risk of endometrial cancer, and in contrast to cancers of most other sites, cancer-specific mortality has risen by approximately 2% every year since 2008 related to the rapidly rising incidence.2Endometrial cancer has traditionally been classified into type I and type II based on morphology.3 The more common subtype, type I, is mostly comprised of endometrioid tumours and is oestrogen-driven, arises from a hyperplastic endometrium, presents at an early stage and has an excellent 5 year survival rate.4 By contrast, type II includes non-endometrioid tumours, specifically serous, carcinosarcoma and clear cell subtypes, which are biologically aggressive tumours with a poor prognosis that are often diagnosed at an advanced stage.5 Recent efforts have focused on a molecular classification system for more accurate categorisation of endometrial tumours into four groups with distinct prognostic profiles.6 7The majority of endometrial cancers arise through the interplay of familial, genetic and lifestyle factors.

Two inherited cancer predisposition syndromes, Lynch syndrome and the much rarer Cowden syndrome, substantially increase the lifetime risk of endometrial cancer, but these only account for around 3–5% of cases.8–10 Having first or second degree relative(s) with endometrial or colorectal cancer increases endometrial cancer risk, although a large European twin study failed to demonstrate a strong heritable link.11 The authors failed to show that there was greater concordance in monozygotic than dizygotic twins, but the study was based on relatively small numbers of endometrial cancers. Lu and colleagues reported an association between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and endometrial cancer risk, revealing the potential role of SNPs in explaining part of the risk in both the familial and general populations.12 Thus far, many SNPs have been reported to modify susceptibility to endometrial cancer. However, much of this work predated genome wide association studies and is of variable quality.

Understanding genetic predisposition to endometrial cancer could facilitate personalised risk assessment with a view to targeted prevention and screening interventions.13 This emerged as the most important unanswered research question in endometrial cancer according to patients, carers and healthcare professionals in our recently completed James Lind Womb Cancer Alliance Priority Setting Partnership.14 It would be particularly useful for non-endometrioid endometrial cancers, for which advancing age is so far the only predictor.15We therefore conducted a comprehensive systematic review of the literature to provide an overview of the relationship between SNPs and endometrial cancer risk. We compiled a list of the most robust endometrial cancer-associated SNPs. We assessed the applicability of this panel of SNPs with a theoretical polygenic risk score (PRS) calculation.

We also critically appraised the meta-analyses investigating the most frequently reported SNPs in MDM2. Finally, we described all SNPs reported within genes and pathways that are likely involved in endometrial carcinogenesis and metastasis.MethodsOur systematic review follows the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) collaboration 2009 recommendations. The registered protocol is available through PROSPERO (CRD42018091907).16Search strategyWe searched Embase, MEDLINE and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases via the Healthcare Databases Advanced Search (HDAS) platform, from 2007 to 2018, to identify studies reporting associations between polymorphisms and endometrial cancer risk.

Key words including MeSH (Medical Subject Heading) terms and free-text words were searched in both titles and abstracts. The following terms were used. €œendomet*”,“uter*”, “womb”, “cancer(s)”, “neoplasm(s)”, “endometrium tumour”, “carcinoma”, “adenosarcoma”, “clear cell carcinoma”, “carcinosarcoma”, “SNP”, “single nucleotide polymorphism”, “GWAS”, and “genome-wide association study/ies”.

No other restrictions were applied. The search was repeated with time restrictions between 2018 and June 2019 to capture any recent publications.Eligibility criteriaStudies were selected for full-text evaluation if they were primary articles investigating a relationship between endometrial cancer and SNPs. Study outcome was either the increased or decreased risk of endometrial cancer relative to controls reported as an odds ratio (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs).Study selectionThree independent reviewers screened all articles uploaded to a screening spreadsheet developed by Helena VonVille.17 Disagreements were resolved by discussion.

Chronbach’s α score was calculated between reviewers and indicated high consistency at 0.92. Case–control, prospective and retrospective studies, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and both discovery and validation studies were selected for full-text evaluation. Non-English articles, editorials, conference abstracts and proceedings, letters and correspondence, case reports and review articles were excluded.Candidate-gene studies with at least 100 women and GWAS with at least 1000 women in the case arm were selected to ensure reliability of the results, as explained by Spencer et al.18 To construct a panel of up to 30 SNPs with the strongest evidence of association, those with the strongest p values were selected.

For the purpose of an SNP panel, articles utilising broad European or multi-ethnic cohorts were selected. Where overlapping populations were identified, the most comprehensive study was included.Data extraction and synthesisFor each study, the following data were extracted. SNP ID, nearby gene(s)/chromosome location, OR (95% CI), p value, minor or effect allele frequency (MAF/EAF), EA (effect allele) and OA (other allele), adjustment, ethnicity and ancestry, number of cases and controls, endometrial cancer type, and study type including discovery or validation study and meta-analysis.

For risk estimates, a preference towards most adjusted results was applied. For candidate-gene studies, a standard p value of<0.05 was applied and for GWAS a p value of <5×10-8, indicating genome-wide significance, was accepted as statistically significant. However, due to the limited number of SNPs with p values reaching genome-wide significance, this threshold was then lowered to <1×10-5, allowing for marginally significant SNPs to be included.

As shown by Mavaddat et al, for breast cancer, SNPs that fall below genome-wide significance may still be useful for generating a PRS and improving the models.19We estimated the potential value of a PRS based on the most significant SNPs by comparing the predicted risk for a woman with a risk score in the top 1% of the distribution to the mean predicted risk. Per-allele ORs and MAFs were taken from the publications and standard errors (SEs) for the lnORs were derived from published 95% CIs. The PRS was assumed to have a Normal distribution, with mean 2∑βipI and SE, σ, equal to √2∑βi2pI(1−pi), according to the binomial distribution, where the summation is over all SNPs in the risk score.

Hence the relative risk (RR) comparing the top 1% of the distribution to the mean is given by exp(Z0.01σ), where Z is the inverse of the standard normal cumulative distribution.ResultsThe flow chart of study selection is illustrated in figure 1. In total, 453 text articles were evaluated and, of those, 149 articles met our inclusion criteria. One study was excluded from table 1, for having an Asian-only population, as this would make it harder to compare with the rest of the results which were all either multi-ethnic or Caucasian cohorts, as stated in our inclusion criteria for the SNP panel.20 Any SNPs without 95% CIs were also excluded from any downstream analysis.

Additionally, SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (r2 >0.2) with each other were examined, and of those in linkage disequilibrium, the SNP with strongest association was reported. Per allele ORs were used unless stated otherwise.View this table:Table 1 List of top SNPs most likely to contribute to endometrial cancer risk identified through systematic review of recent literature21–25Study selection flow diagram. *Reasons.

Irrelevant articles, articles focusing on other conditions, non-GWAS/candidate-gene study related articles, technical and duplicate articles. GWAS, genome-wide association study. Adapted from.

Moher D, Liberati A, Tetzlaff J, Altman DG, The PRISMA Group (2009). Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. The PRISMA Statement.

PLoS Med 6(6). E1000097. Doi:10.1371/journal.pmed1000097." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 1 Study selection flow diagram.

*Reasons. Irrelevant articles, articles focusing on other conditions, non-GWAS/candidate-gene study related articles, technical and duplicate articles. GWAS, genome-wide association study.

Adapted from. Moher D, Liberati A, Tetzlaff J, Altman DG, The PRISMA Group (2009). Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses.

The PRISMA Statement. PLoS Med 6(6). E1000097.

Doi:10.1371/journal.pmed1000097.Top SNPs associated with endometrial cancer riskFollowing careful interpretation of the data, 24 independent SNPs with the lowest p values that showed the strongest association with endometrial cancer were obtained (table 1).21–25 These SNPs are located in or around genes coding for transcription factors, cell growth and apoptosis regulators, and enzymes involved in the steroidogenesis pathway. All the SNPs presented here were reported on the basis of a GWAS or in one case, an exome-wide association study, and hence no SNPs from candidate-gene studies made it to the list. This is partly due to the nature of larger GWAS providing more comprehensive and powered results as opposed to candidate gene studies.

Additionally, a vast majority of SNPs reported by candidate-gene studies were later refuted by large-scale GWAS such as in the case of TERT and MDM2 variants.26 27 The exception to this is the CYP19 gene, where candidate-gene studies reported an association between variants in this gene with endometrial cancer in both Asian and broad European populations, and this association was more recently confirmed by large-scale GWAS.21 28–30 Moreover, a recent article authored by O’Mara and colleagues reviewed the GWAS that identified most of the currently known SNPs associated with endometrial cancer.31Most of the studies represented in table 1 are GWAS and the majority of these involved broad European populations. Those having a multi-ethnic cohort also consisted primarily of broad European populations. Only four of the variants in table 1 are located in coding regions of a gene, or in regulatory flanking regions around the gene.

Thus, most of these variants would not be expected to cause any functional effects on the gene or the resulting protein. An eQTL search using GTEx Portal showed that some of the SNPs are significantly associated (p<0.05) with modified transcription levels of the respective genes in various tissues such as prostate (rs11263761), thyroid (rs9668337), pituitary (rs2747716), breast mammary (rs882380) and testicular (rs2498794) tissue, as summarised in table 2.View this table:Table 2 List of eQTL hits for the selected panel of SNPsThe only variant for which there was an indication of a specific association with non-endometrioid endometrial cancer was rs148261157 near the BCL11A gene. The A allele of this SNP had a moderately higher association in the non-endometrioid arm (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.32 to 2.04.

P=9.6×10-6) compared with the endometrioid arm (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.38. P=4.7×10-6).21Oestrogen receptors α and β encoded by ESR1 and ESR2, respectively, have been extensively studied due to the assumed role of oestrogens in the development of endometrial cancer. O’Mara et al reported a lead SNP (rs79575945) in the ESR1 region that was associated with endometrial cancer (p=1.86×10-5).24 However, this SNP did not reach genome-wide significance in a more recent larger GWAS.21 No statistically significant associations have been reported between endometrial cancer and SNPs in the ESR2 gene region.AKT is an oncogene linked to endometrial carcinogenesis.

It is involved in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pro-proliferative signalling pathway to inactivate apoptosis and allow cell survival. The A allele of rs2494737 and G allele of rs2498796 were reported to be associated with increased and decreased risk of endometrial cancer in 2016, respectively.22 30 However, this association was not replicated in a larger GWAS in 2018.21 Nevertheless, given the previous strong indications, and biological basis that could explain endometrial carcinogenesis, we decided to include an AKT1 variant (rs2498794) in our results.PTEN is a multi-functional tumour suppressor gene that regulates the AKT/PKB signalling pathway and is commonly mutated in many cancers including endometrial cancer.32 Loss-of-function germline mutations in PTEN are responsible for Cowden syndrome, which exerts a lifetime risk of endometrial cancer of up to 28%.9 Lacey and colleagues studied SNPs in the PTEN gene region. However, none showed significant differences in frequency between 447 endometrial cancer cases and 439 controls of European ancestry.33KRAS mutations are known to be present in endometrial cancer.

These can be activated by high levels of KLF5 (transcriptional activator). Three SNPs have been identified in or around KLF5 that are associated with endometrial cancer. The G allele of rs11841589 (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.21.

P=4.83×10-11), the A allele of rs9600103 (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.30. P=3.76×10-12) and C allele of rs7981863 (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.20. P=2.70×10-17) have all been found to be associated with an increased likelihood of endometrial cancer in large European cohorts.21 30 34 It is worth noting that these SNPs are not independent, and hence they quite possibly tag the same causal variant.The MYC family of proto-oncogenes encode transcription factors that regulate cell proliferation, which can contribute to cancer development if dysregulated.

The recent GWAS by O’Mara et al reported three SNPs within the MYC region that reached genome-wide significance with conditional p values reaching at least 5×10–8.35To test the utility of these SNPs as predictive markers, we devised a theoretical PRS calculation using the log ORs and EAFs per SNP from the published data. The results were very encouraging with an RR of 3.16 for the top 1% versus the mean, using all the top SNPs presented in table 1 and 2.09 when using only the SNPs that reached genome-wide significance (including AKT1).Controversy surrounding MDM2 variant SNP309MDM2 negatively regulates tumour suppressor gene TP53, and as such, has been extensively studied in relation to its potential role in predisposition to endometrial cancer. Our search identified six original studies of the association between MDM2 SNP rs2279744 (also referred to as SNP309) and endometrial cancer, all of which found a statistically significant increased risk per copy of the G allele.

Two more original studies were identified through our full-text evaluation. However, these were not included here as they did not meet our inclusion criteria—one due to small sample size, the other due to studying rs2279744 status dependent on another SNP.36 37 Even so, the two studies were described in multiple meta-analyses that are listed in table 3. Different permutations of these eight original studies appear in at least eight published meta-analyses.

However, even the largest meta-analysis contained <2000 cases (table 3)38View this table:Table 3 Characteristics of studies that examined MDM2 SNP rs2279744In comparison, a GWAS including nearly 13 000 cases found no evidence of an association with OR and corresponding 95% CI of 1.00 (0.97 to 1.03) and a p value of 0.93 (personal communication).21 Nevertheless, we cannot completely rule out a role for MDM2 variants in endometrial cancer predisposition as the candidate-gene studies reported larger effects in Asians, whereas the GWAS primarily contained participants of European ancestry. There is also some suggestion that the SNP309 variant is in linkage disequilibrium with another variant, SNP285, which confers an opposite effect.It is worth noting that the SNP285C/SNP309G haplotype frequency was observed in up to 8% of Europeans, thus requiring correction for the confounding effect of SNP285C in European studies.39 However, aside from one study conducted by Knappskog et al, no other study including the meta-analyses corrected for the confounding effect of SNP285.40 Among the studies presented in table 3, Knappskog et al (2012) reported that after correcting for SNP285, the OR for association of this haplotype with endometrial cancer was much lower, though still significant. Unfortunately, the meta-analyses which synthesised Knappskog et al (2012), as part of their analysis, did not correct for SNP285C in the European-based studies they included.38 41 42 It is also concerning that two meta-analyses using the same primary articles failed to report the same result, in two instances.38 42–44DiscussionThis article represents the most comprehensive systematic review to date, regarding critical appraisal of the available evidence of common low-penetrance variants implicated in predisposition to endometrial cancer.

We have identified the most robust SNPs in the context of endometrial cancer risk. Of those, only 19 were significant at genome-wide level and a further five were considered marginally significant. The largest GWAS conducted in this field was the discovery- and meta-GWAS by O’Mara et al, which utilised 12 096 cases and 108 979 controls.21 Despite the inclusion of all published GWAS and around 5000 newly genotyped cases, the total number did not reach anywhere near what is currently available for other common cancers such as breast cancer.

For instance, BCAC (Breast Cancer Association Consortium) stands at well over 200 000 individuals with more than half being cases, and resulted in identification of ~170 SNPs in relation to breast cancer.19 45 A total of 313 SNPs including imputations were then used to derive a PRS for breast cancer.19 Therefore, further efforts should be directed to recruit more patients, with deep phenotypic clinical data to allow for relevant adjustments and subgroup analyses to be conducted for better precision.A recent pre-print study by Zhang and colleagues examined the polygenicity and potential for SNP-based risk prediction for 14 common cancers, including endometrial cancer, using available summary-level data from European-ancestry datasets.46 They estimated that there are just over 1000 independent endometrial cancer susceptibility SNPs, and that a PRS comprising all such SNPs would have an area under the receiver-operator curve of 0.64, similar to that predicted for ovarian cancer, but lower than that for the other cancers in the study. The modelling in the paper suggests that an endometrial cancer GWAS double the size of the current largest study would be able to identify susceptibility SNPs together explaining 40% of the genetic variance, but that in order to explain 75% of the genetic variance it would be necessary to have a GWAS comprising close to 150 000 cases and controls, far in excess of what is currently feasible.We found that the literature consists mainly of candidate-gene studies with small sample sizes, meta-analyses reporting conflicting results despite using the same set of primary articles, and multiple reports of significant SNPs that have not been validated by any larger GWAS. The candidate-gene studies were indeed the most useful and cheaper technique available until the mid to late 2000s.

However, a lack of reproducibility (particularly due to population stratification and reporting bias), uncertainty of reported associations, and considerably high false discovery rates make these studies much less appropriate in the post-GWAS era. Unlike the candidate-gene approach, GWAS do not require prior knowledge, selection of genes or SNPs, and provide vast amounts of data. Furthermore, both the genotyping process and data analysis phases have become cheaper, the latter particularly due to faster and open-access pre-phasing and imputation tools being made available.It is clear from table 1 that some SNPs were reported with wide 95% CI, which can be directly attributed to small sample sizes particularly when restricting the cases to non-endometrioid histology only, low EAF or poor imputation quality.

Thus, these should be interpreted with caution. Additionally, most of the SNPs reported by candidate-gene studies were not detected by the largest GWAS to date conducted by O’Mara et al.21 However, this does not necessarily mean that the possibility of those SNPs being relevant should be completely dismissed. Moreover, meta-analyses were attempted for other variants.

However, these showed no statistically significant association and many presented with high heterogeneity between the respective studies (data not shown). Furthermore, as many studies utilised the same set of cases and/or controls, conducting a meta-analysis was not possible for a good number of SNPs. It is therefore unequivocal that the literature is crowded with numerous small candidate-gene studies and conflicting data.

This makes it particularly hard to detect novel SNPs and conduct meaningful meta-analyses.We found convincing evidence for 19 variants that indicated the strongest association with endometrial cancer, as shown in table 1. The associations between endometrial cancer and variants in or around HNF1B, CYP19A1, SOX4, MYC, KLF and EIF2AK found in earlier GWAS were then replicated in the latest and largest GWAS. These SNPs showed promising potential in a theoretical PRS we devised based on published data.

Using all 24 or genome-wide significant SNPs only, women with a PRS in the top 1% of the distribution would be predicted to have a risk of endometrial cancer 3.16 and 2.09 times higher than the mean risk, respectively.However, the importance of these variants and relevance of the proximate genes in a functional or biological context is challenging to evaluate. Long distance promoter regulation by enhancers may disguise the genuine target gene. In addition, enhancers often do not loop to the nearest gene, further complicating the relevance of nearby gene(s) to a GWAS hit.

In order to elucidate biologically relevant candidate target genes in endometrial cancer, O’Mara et al looked into promoter-associated chromatin looping using a modern HiChIP approach.47 The authors utilised normal and tumoural endometrial cell lines for this analysis which showed significant enrichment for endometrial cancer heritability, with 103 candidate target genes identified across the 13 risk loci identified by the largest ECAC GWAS. Notable genes identified here were CDKN2A and WT1, and their antisense counterparts. The former was reported to be nearby of rs1679014 and the latter of rs10835920, as shown in table 1.

Moreover, of the 36 candidate target genes, 17 were found to be downregulated while 19 were upregulated in endometrial tumours.The authors also investigated overlap between the 13 endometrial cancer risk loci and top eQTL variants for each target gene.47 In whole blood, of the two particular lead SNPs, rs8822380 at 17q21.32 was a top eQTL for SNX11 and HOXB2, whereas rs937213 at 15q15.1 was a top eQTL for SRP14. In endometrial tumour, rs7579014 at 2p16.1 was found to be a top eQTL for BCL11A. This is particularly interesting because BCL11A was the only nearby/candidate gene that had a GWAS association reported in both endometrioid and non-endometrioid subtypes.

The study looked at protein–protein interactions between endometrial cancer drivers and candidate target gene products. Significant interactions were observed with TP53 (most significant), AKT, PTEN, ESR1 and KRAS, among others. Finally, when 103 target candidate genes and 387 proteins were combined together, 462 pathways were found to be significantly enriched.

Many of these are related to gene regulation, cancer, obesity, insulinaemia and oestrogen exposure. This study clearly showed a potential biological relevance for some of the SNPs reported by ECAC GWAS in 2018.Most of the larger included studies used cohorts primarily composed of women of broad European descent. Hence, there are negligible data available for other ethnicities, particularly African women.

This is compounded by the lack of reference genotype data available for comparative analysis, making it harder for research to be conducted in ethnicities other than Europeans. This poses a problem for developing risk prediction models that are equally valuable and predictive across populations. Thus, our results also are of limited applicability to non-European populations.Furthermore, considering that non-endometrioid cases comprise a small proportion (~20%) of all endometrial cancer cases, much larger cohort sizes are needed to detect any genuine signals for non-endometrioid tumours.

Most of the evaluated studies looked at either overall/mixed endometrial cancer subtypes or endometrioid histology, and those that looked at variant associations with non-endometrioid histology were unlikely to have enough power to detect any signal with statistical significance. This is particularly concerning because non-endometrioid subtypes are biologically aggressive tumours with a much poorer prognosis that contribute disproportionately to mortality from endometrial cancer. It is particularly important that attempts to improve early detection and prevention of endometrial cancer focus primarily on improving outcomes from these subtypes.

It is also worth noting that, despite the current shift towards a molecular classification of endometrial cancer, most studies used the overarching classical Bokhman’s classification system, type I versus type II, or no histological classification system at all. Therefore, it is important to create and follow a standardised and comprehensive classification system for reporting tumour subtypes for future studies.This study compiled and presented available information for an extensively studied, yet unproven in large datasets, SNP309 variant in MDM2. Currently, there is no convincing evidence for an association between this variant and endometrial cancer risk.

Additionally, of all the studies, only one accounted for the opposing effect of a nearby variant SNP285 in their analyses. Thus, we conclude that until confirmed by a sufficiently large GWAS, this variant should not be considered significant in influencing the risk of endometrial cancer and therefore not included in a PRS. This is also true for the majority of the SNPs reported in candidate-gene studies, as the numbers fall far short of being able to detect genuine signals.This systematic review presents the most up-to-date evidence for endometrial cancer susceptibility variants, emphasising the need for further large-scale studies to identify more variants of importance, and validation of these associations.

Until data from larger and more diverse cohorts are available, the top 24 SNPs presented here are the most robust common genetic variants that affect endometrial cancer risk. The multiplicative effects of these SNPs could be used in a PRS to allow personalised risk prediction models to be developed for targeted screening and prevention interventions for women at greatest risk of endometrial cancer..

IntroductionIn recent years, many studies have been published on new diagnostic possibilities and management approaches in cohorts of patients suspected to have a disorder/difference of sex development (DSD).1–13 Based on these studies, it has become clear that services and institutions http://voiture-et-handicap.fr/levaquin-500mg-tablet-price/ still differ in the composition of the multidisciplinary teams that provide care for patients who have a DSD.11 14 Several projects have now worked to resolve where can you get levaquin this variability in care. The European Cooperation in Science and Technology (EU COST) action BM1303 ‘A systematic elucidation of differences of sex development’ has been a platform to achieve European agreement on harmonisation of clinical management and laboratory practices.15–17 Another such initiative involved an update of the 2006 DSD consensus document by an international group of professionals and patient representatives.18 These where can you get levaquin initiatives have highlighted how cultural and financial aspects and the availability of resources differ significantly between countries and societies, a situation that hampers supranational agreement on common diagnostic protocols. As only a few national guidelines have been published in international journals, comparison of these guidelines is difficult even though such a comparison is necessary to capture the differences and initiate actions to overcome them. Nonetheless, four DSD (expert) centres located in the Netherlands and Flanders (the Dutch-speaking Northern part of Belgium) have collaborated to produce a detailed guideline on diagnostics in DSD.19 This shows that a supranational where can you get levaquin guideline can be a reasonable approach for countries with similarly structured healthcare systems and similar resources.

Within the guideline there is agreement that optimisation of expertise and care can be achieved through centralisation, for example, by limiting analysis of next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based diagnostic panels to only a few centres and by centralising pathological review of gonadal tissues. International networks such as the European Reference Network for rare endocrine conditions (EndoERN), in which DSD is embedded, may facilitate the expansion of this kind where can you get levaquin of collaboration across Europe.This paper highlights key discussion points in the Dutch-Flemish guideline that have been insufficiently addressed in the literature thus far because they reflect evolving technologies or less visible stakeholders. For example, prenatal observation of an atypical aspect of the genitalia indicating a possible DSD is becoming increasingly common, and we discuss appropriate counselling and a diagnostic approach for these cases, including the option of using NGS-based genetic testing. So far, little attention has been paid to this process.20 21 Furthermore, informing patients and/or their parents about atypical sex development and where can you get levaquin why this may warrant referral to a specialised team may be challenging, especially for professionals with limited experience in DSD.22 23 Therefore, a section of the Dutch-Flemish guideline was written for these healthcare providers.

Moreover, this enables DSD specialists to refer to the guideline when advising a referral. Transition from the prenatal where can you get levaquin to the postnatal team and from the paediatric to the adult team requires optimal communication between the specialists involved. Application of NGS-based techniques may lead to a higher diagnostic yield, providing a molecular genetic diagnosis in previously unsolved cases.16 We address the timing of this testing and the problems associated with this technique such as the interpretation of variants of unknown clinical significance (VUS). Similarly, histopathological interpretation and classification of removed gonadal tissue is challenging and would benefit from international collaboration and centralisation of expertise.MethodsFor the guideline revision, an interdisciplinary multicentre group was where can you get levaquin formed with all members responsible for updating the literature for a specific part of the guideline.

Literature search in PubMed was not systematic, but rather intended to be broad in order to cover all areas and follow expert opinions. This approach where can you get levaquin is more in line with the Clinical Practice Advisory Document method described by Burke et al24 for guidelines involving genetic practice because it is often troublesome to substantiate such guidelines with sufficient evidence due to the rapid changes in testing methods, for example, gene panels. All input provided by the group was synthesised by the chairperson (YvB), who also reviewed abstracts of papers on DSD published between 2010 and September 2017 for the guideline and up to October 2019 for this paper. Abstracts had to be written in English and were identified using a broad range of Medical Subject Headings terms (eg, DSD, genetic, review, diagnosis, diagnostics, 46,XX DSD, where can you get levaquin 46,XY DSD, guideline, multidisciplinary care).

Next, potentially relevant papers on diagnostic procedures in DSD were selected. Case reports were excluded, where can you get levaquin as were articles that were not open access or retrievable through institutional access. Based on this, a draft guideline was produced that was in line with the international principles of good diagnostic care in DSD. This draft was discussed by the where can you get levaquin writing committee and, after having obtained agreement on remaining points of discussion, revised into a final draft.

This version was sent to a broad group of professionals from academic centres and DSD teams whose members had volunteered to review the draft guideline. After receiving and incorporating their input, the final version was presented to the paediatric where can you get levaquin and genetic associations for approval. After approval by the members of the paediatric (NVK), clinical genetic (VKGN) and genetic laboratory (VKGL) associations, the guideline was published on their respective websites.19 Although Turner syndrome and Klinefelter syndrome are considered to be part of the DSD spectrum, they are not extensively discussed in this diagnostic guideline as guidelines dedicated to these syndromes already exist.25 26 However, some individuals with Turner syndrome or Klinefelter syndrome may present with ambiguous or atypical genitalia and may therefore initially follow the DSD diagnostic process.Guideline highlightsPrenatal settingPresentationThe most frequent prenatal presentation of a DSD condition is atypical genitalia found on prenatal ultrasound as an isolated finding or in combination with other structural anomalies. This usually occurs after the 20-week where can you get levaquin routine medical ultrasound for screening of congenital anomalies, but may also occur earlier, for example, when a commercial ultrasound is performed at the request of the parents.Another way DSD can be diagnosed before birth is when invasive prenatal genetic testing carried out for a different reason, for example, due to suspicion of other structural anomalies, reveals a discrepancy between the genotypic sex and the phenotypic sex seen by ultrasound.

In certified laboratories, the possibility of a sample switch is extremely low but should be ruled out immediately. More often, the discrepancy will be due to sex-chromosome where can you get levaquin mosaicism or a true form of DSD.A situation now occurring with increasing frequency is a discrepancy between the genotypic sex revealed by non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT), which is now available to high-risk pregnant women in the Netherlands and to all pregnant women in Belgium, and later ultrasound findings. NIPT screens for CNVs in the fetus. However, depending on legal restrictions and/or ethical considerations, the X and where can you get levaquin Y chromosomes are not always included in NIPT analysis and reports.

If the X and Y chromosomes are included, it is important to realise that the presence of a Y-chromosome does not necessarily imply male fetal development. At the time that NIPT is performed (usually 11–13 weeks), genital development cannot be reliably appreciated by ultrasound, so where can you get levaquin any discrepancy or atypical aspect of the genitalia will only be noticed later in pregnancy and should prompt further evaluation.Counselling and diagnosticsIf a DSD is suspected, first-line sonographers and obstetricians should refer the couple to their colleague prenatal specialists working with or in a DSD team. After confirming an atypical genital on ultrasound, the specialist team should offer the couple a referral for genetic counselling to discuss the possibility of performing invasive prenatal testing (usually an amniocentesis) to identify an underlying cause that fits the ultrasound findings.22 23 To enable the parents to make a well-informed decision, prenatal counselling should, in our opinion, include. Information on where can you get levaquin the ultrasound findings and the limitations of this technique.

The procedure(s) that can be followed, including the risks associated with an amniocentesis. And the type of information genetic testing can where can you get levaquin and cannot provide. Knowing which information has been provided and what words have been used by the prenatal specialist is very helpful for those involved in postnatal care.It is important that parents understand that the biological sex of a baby is determined by a complex interplay of chromosomes, genes and hormones, and thus that assessment of the presence or absence of a Y-chromosome alone is insufficient to assign the sex of their unborn child or, as in any unborn child, say anything about the child’s future gender identity.Expecting parents can be counselled by the clinical geneticist and the psychologist from the DSD team, although other DSD specialists can also be involved. The clinical geneticist should be experienced in prenatal counselling and well informed about the diagnostic possibilities given the limited time span in where can you get levaquin which test results need to be available to allow parents to make a well-informed decision about whether or not to continue the pregnancy.

Termination of pregnancy can be considered, for instance, in a syndromic form of DSD with multiple malformations, but when the DSD occurs as an apparently isolated condition, expecting parents may also consider where can you get levaquin termination of pregnancy, which, although considered controversial by some, is legal in Belgium and the Netherlands. The psychologist of the DSD team can support parents during and after pregnancy and help them cope with feelings of uncertainty and eventual considerations of a termination of pregnancy, as well as with practical issues, for example, how to inform others. The stress of not knowing exactly what the child’s genitalia will look like and uncertainty about the diagnosis, where can you get levaquin treatment and prognosis cannot be avoided completely. Parents are informed that if the postnatal phenotype is different from what was prenatally expected, the advice given about diagnostic testing can be adjusted accordingly, for example, if a hypospadias is milder than was expected based on prenatal ultrasound images.

In our experience, parents appreciate having already spoken to some members of the DSD team during pregnancy and having a contact person before where can you get levaquin birth.After expert prenatal counselling, a significant number of pregnant couples decline prenatal testing (personal experience IALG, MK, ABD, YvB, MC and HC-vdG). At birth, umbilical cord blood is a good source for (molecular) karyotyping and storage of DNA and can be obtained by the obstetrician, midwife or neonatologist. The terminology used in communication with parents should be carefully chosen,22 23 and midwives and staff of neonatal and delivery units should be clearly instructed to use gender-neutral and non-stigmatising vocabulary (eg, ‘your baby’) as long as sex assignment is pending.An algorithm where can you get levaquin for diagnostic evaluation of a suspected DSD in the prenatal situation is proposed in figure 1. When couples opt for invasive prenatal diagnosis, the genetic analysis usually involves an (SNP)-array.

It was recently estimated that >30% of individuals who have a DSD have additional structural anomalies, with cardiac and where can you get levaquin neurological anomalies and fetal growth restriction being particularly common.27 28 If additional anomalies are seen, the geneticist can consider specific gene defects that may underlie a known genetic syndrome or carry out NGS. NGS-based techniques have also now made their appearance in prenatal diagnosis of congenital anomalies.29 30 Panels using these techniques can be specific for genes involved in DSD, or be larger panels covering multiple congenital anomalies, and are usually employed with trio-analysis to compare variants identified in the child with the parents’ genetics.29–31 Finding a genetic cause before delivery can help reduce parental stress in the neonatal period and speed up decisions regarding gender assignment. In such cases there is no tight time limit, and we propose completing the analysis well before the expected where can you get levaquin delivery.Disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the prenatal setting. A diagnostic algorithm.

*SOX9. Upstream anomalies and balanced translocations at promotor sites!. Conventional karyotyping can be useful. NGS, next-generation sequencing." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 1 Disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the prenatal setting.

A diagnostic algorithm. *SOX9. Upstream anomalies and balanced translocations at promotor sites!. Conventional karyotyping can be useful.

NGS, next-generation sequencing.First contact by a professional less experienced in DSDWhereas most current guidelines start from the point when an individual has been referred to the DSD team,1 15 the Dutch-Flemish guideline dedicates a chapter to healthcare professionals less experienced in DSD as they are often the first to suspect or identify such a condition. Apart from the paper of Indyk,7 little guidance is available for these professionals about how to act in such a situation. The chapter in the Dutch-Flemish guideline summarises the various clinical presentations that a DSD can have and provides information on how to communicate with parents and/or patients about the findings of the physical examination, the first-line investigations and the need for prompt referral to a specialised centre for further evaluation. Clinical examples are offered to illustrate some of these recurring situations.

The medical issues in DSD can be very challenging, and the social and psychological impact is high. For neonates with ambiguous genitalia, sex assignment is an urgent and crucial issue, and it is mandatory that parents are informed that it is possible to postpone registration of their child’s sex. In cases where sex assignment has already taken place, the message that the development of the gonads or genitalia is still atypical is complicated and distressing for patients and parents or carers. A list of contact details for DSD centres and patient organisations in the Netherlands and Flanders is attached to the Dutch-Flemish guideline.

Publishing such a list, either in guidelines or online, can help healthcare professionals find the nearest centres for consultations and provide patients and patient organisations with an overview of the centres where expertise is available.Timing and place of genetic testing using NGS-based gene panelsThe diagnostic workup that is proposed for 46,XX and 46,XY DSD is shown in figures 2 and 3, respectively. Even with the rapidly expanding molecular possibilities, a (family) history and a physical examination remain the essential first steps in the diagnostic process. Biochemical and hormonal screening aim at investigating serum electrolytes, renal function and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axes. Ultrasound screening of kidneys and internal genitalia, as well as establishing genotypic sex, should be accomplished within 48 hours and complete the baseline diagnostic work-up of a child born with ambiguous genitalia.1 16 32 3346,XX disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the postnatal setting.

A diagnostic algorithm. NGS, next-generation sequencing. CAH, Congenital adrenal hyperplasia. AMH, Anti-Müllerian Hormone." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 2 46,XX disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the postnatal setting.

A diagnostic algorithm. NGS, next-generation sequencing. CAH, Congenital adrenal hyperplasia. AMH, Anti-Müllerian Hormone.46,XY disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the postnatal setting.

A diagnostic algorithm. * SOX9. Upstream anomalies and balanced translocations at promotor sites!. Conventional karyotyping can be useful.

NGS, next-generation sequencing." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 3 46,XY disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the postnatal setting. A diagnostic algorithm. *SOX9. Upstream anomalies and balanced translocations at promotor sites!.

Conventional karyotyping can be useful. NGS, next-generation sequencing.Very recently, a European position paper has been published focusing on the genetic workup of DSD.16 It highlights the limitations and drawbacks of NGS-based tests, which include the chance of missing subtle structural variants such as CNVs and mosaicism and the fact that NGS cannot detect methylation defects or other epigenetic changes.16 28 31 Targeted DNA analysis is preferred in cases where hormonal investigations suggest a block in steroidogenesis (eg, 11-β-hydroxylase deficiency, 21-hydroxylase deficiency), or in the context of a specific clinical constellation such as the often coincidental finding of Müllerian structures in a boy with normal external genitalia or cryptorchidism, that is, persistent Müllerian duct syndrome.33 34 Alternative tests should also be considered depending on the available information. Sometimes, a simple mouth swab for FISH analysis can detect mosaic XY/X in a male with hypospadias or asymmetric gonadal development or in a female with little or no Turner syndrome stigmata and a normal male molecular karyotyping profile or peripheral blood karyotype. Such targeted testing avoids incidental findings and is cheaper and faster than analysis of a large NGS-based panel, although the cost difference is rapidly declining.However, due to the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of DSD conditions, the most cost-effective next steps in the majority of cases are whole exome sequencing followed by panel analysis of genes involved in genital development and function or trio-analysis of a large gene panel (such as a Mendeliome).16 35–38 Pretest genetic counselling involves discussing what kind of information will be reported to patients or parents and the chance of detecting VUS, and the small risk of incidental findings when analysing a DSD panel should be mentioned.

Laboratories also differ in what class of variants they report.39 In our experience, the fear of incidental findings is a major reason why some parents refrain from genetic testing.Timing of the DSD gene panel analysis is also important. While some patients or parents prefer that all diagnostic procedures be performed as soon as possible, others need time to reflect on the complex information related to more extensive genetic testing and on its possible consequences. If parents or patients do not consent to panel-based genetic testing, analysis of specific genes, such as WT1, should be considered when appropriate in view of the clinical consequences if a mutation is present (eg, clinical surveillance of renal function and screening for Wilms’ tumour in the case of WT1 mutations). Genes that are more frequently involved in DSD (eg, SRY, NR5A1) and that match the specific clinical and hormonal features in a given patient could also be considered for sequencing.

Targeted gene analysis may also be preferred in centres located in countries that do not have the resources or technical requirements to perform NGS panel-based genetic testing. Alternatively, participation by these centres in international collaborative networks may allow them to outsource the molecular genetic workup abroad.Gene panels differ between centres and are regularly updated based on scientific progress. A comparison of DSD gene panels used in recent studies can be found at https://www.nature.com/articles/s41574-018-0010-8%23Sec46.15 The panels currently used at the coauthors’ institutions can be found on their respective websites. Given the pace of change, it is important to regularly consider repeating analysis in patients with an unexplained DSD, for example, when they transition into adult care or when they move from one centre to another.

This also applies to patients in whom a clinical diagnosis has never been genetically confirmed. Confusion may arise when the diagnosis cannot be confirmed or when a mutation is identified in a different gene, for example, NR5A1 in someone with a clinical diagnosis of CAIS that has other consequences for relatives. Hence, new genetic counselling should always accompany new diagnostic endeavours.Class 3 variants and histopathological examinationsThe rapidly evolving diagnostic possibilities raise new questions. What do laboratories report?.

How should we deal with the frequent findings of mainly unique VUS or class 3 variants (ACMG recommendation) in the many different DSD-related genes in the diagnostic setting?. Reporting VUS can be a source of uncertainty for parents, but not reporting these variants precludes further investigations to determine their possible pathogenicity. It can also be difficult to prove variant pathogenicity, both on gene-level and variant-level.39 Moreover, given the gonad-specific expression of some genes and the variable phenotypic spectrum and reduced penetrance, segregation analysis is not always informative. A class 3 variant that does not fit the clinical presentation may be unrelated to the observed phenotype, but it could also represent a newly emerging phenotype.

This was recently demonstrated by the identification of the NR5A1 mutation, R92W, in individuals with 46,XX testicular and ovotesticular DSD.40 This gene had previously been associated with 46,XY DSD. In diagnostic laboratories, there is usually no capacity or expertise to conduct large-scale functional studies to determine pathogenicity of these unique class 3 VUS in the different genes involved in DSD. Functional validation of variants identified in novel genes may be more attractive in a research context. However, for individual families with VUS in well-established DSD genes such as AR or HSD17B3, functional analysis may provide a confirmed diagnosis that implies for relatives the option of undergoing their own DNA analysis and estimating the genetic risk of their own future offspring.

This makes genetic follow-up important in these cases and demonstrates the usefulness of international databases and networks and the centralisation of functional studies of genetic variants in order to reduce costs and maximise expertise.The same is true for histopathological description, germ-cell tumour risk assessment in specific forms of DSD and classification of gonadal samples. Germ-cell tumour risk is related to the type of DSD (among other factors), but it is impossible to make risk estimates in individual cases.41–44 Gonadectomy may be indicated in cases with high-risk dysgenetic abdominal gonads that cannot be brought into a stable superficial (ie, inguinal, labioscrotal) position that allows clinical or radiological surveillance, or to avoid virilisation due to 5-alpha reductase deficiency in a 46,XY girl with a stable female gender identity.45 Pathological examination of DSD gonads requires specific expertise. For example, the differentiation between benign germ cell abnormalities, such as delayed maturation and (pre)malignant development of germ cells, is crucial for clinical management but can be very troublesome.46 Centralised pathological examination of gonadal biopsy and gonadectomy samples in one centre, or a restricted number of centres, on a national scale can help to overcome the problem of non-uniform classification and has proven feasible in the Netherlands and Belgium. We therefore believe that uniform assessment and classification of gonadal differentiation patterns should also be addressed in guidelines on DSD management.International databases of gonadal tissues are crucial for learning more about the risk of malignancy in different forms of DSD, but they are only reliable if uniform criteria for histological classification are strictly applied.46 These criteria could be incorporated in many existing networks such as the I-DSD consortium, the Disorders of Sex Development Translational Research Network, the European Reference Network on Urogenital Diseases (eUROGEN), the EndoERN and COST actions.15–17 47Communication at the transition from paediatric to adult carePaediatric and adult teams need to collaborate closely to facilitate a well-organised transition from paediatric to adult specialist care.15 48–50 Both teams need to exchange information optimally and should consider transition as a longitudinal process rather than a fixed moment in time.

Age-appropriate information is key at all ages, and an overview of topics to be discussed at each stage is described by Cools et al.15 Table 1 shows an example of how transition can be organised.View this table:Table 1 Example of transition table as used in the DSD clinic of the Erasmus Medical CenterPsychological support and the continued provision of information remains important for individuals with a DSD at all ages.15 22 In addition to the information given by the DSD team members, families and patients can benefit from resources such as support groups and information available on the internet.47 Information available online should be checked for accuracy and completeness when referring patients and parents to internet sites.Recommendations for future actionsMost guidelines and articles on the diagnosis and management of DSD are aimed at specialists and are only published in specialist journals or on websites for endocrinologists, urologists or geneticists. Yet there is a need for guidelines directed towards first-line and second-line healthcare workers that summarise the recommendations about the first crucial steps in the management of DSD. These should be published in widely available general medical journals and online, along with a national list of DSD centres. Furthermore, DSD (expert) centres should provide continuous education to all those who may be involved in the identification of individuals with a DSD in order to enable these healthcare professionals to recognise atypical genitalia, to promptly refer individuals who have a DSD and to inform the patient and parents about this and subsequent diagnostic procedures.As DSD continues to be a rare condition, it will take time to evaluate the effects of having such a guideline on the preparedness of first-line and second-line healthcare workers to recognise DSD conditions.

One way to evaluate this might be the development and use of questionnaires asking patients, carers and families and referring physicians how satisfied they were with the initial medical consultation and referral and what could be improved. A helpful addition to existing international databases that collect information on genetic variations would be a list of centres that offer suitable functional studies for certain genes, ideally covering the most frequently mutated genes (at minimum).Patient organisations can also play an important role in informing patients about newly available diagnostic or therapeutic strategies and options, and their influence and specific role has now been recognised and discussed in several publications.17 47 However, it should be kept in mind that these organisations do not represent all patients, as a substantial number of patients and parents are not member of such an organisation.Professionals have to provide optimal medical care based on well-established evidence, or at least on broad consensus. Yet not everything can be regulated by recommendations and guidelines. Options, ideas and wishes should be openly discussed between professionals, patients and families within their confidential relationship.

This will enable highly individualised holistic care tailored to the patient’s needs and expectations. Once they are well-informed of all available options, parents and/or patients can choose what they consider the optimal care for their children or themselves.15 16ConclusionThe Dutch-Flemish guideline uniquely addresses some topics that are under-represented in the literature, thus adding some key aspects to those addressed in recent consensus papers and guidelines.15–17 33 47As more children with a DSD are now being identified prenatally, and the literature on prenatal diagnosis of DSD remains scarce,20 21 we propose a prenatal diagnostic algorithm and emphasise the importance of having a prenatal specialist involved in or collaborating with DSD (expert) centres.We also stress that good communication between all involved parties is essential. Professionals should be well informed about protocols and communication. Collaboration between centres is necessary to optimise aspects of care such as uniform interpretation of gonadal pathology and functional testing of class 3 variants found by genetic testing.

Guidelines can provide a framework within which individualised patient care should be discussed with all stakeholders.AcknowledgmentsThe authors would like to thank the colleagues of the DSD teams for their input in and critical reading of the Dutch-Flemish guideline. Amsterdam University Center (AMC and VU), Maastricht University Medical Center, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, Radboud University Medical Center Nijmegen, University Medical Center Groningen, University Medical Center Utrecht, Ghent University Hospital. The authors would like to thank Kate McIntyre for editing the revised manuscript and Tom de Vries Lentsch for providing the figures as a PDF. Three of the authors of this publication are members of the European Reference Network for rare endocrine diseases—Project ID 739543.IntroductionEndometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological malignancy in the developed world.1 Its incidence has risen over the last two decades as a consequence of the ageing population, fewer hysterectomies for benign disease and the obesity epidemic.

In the USA, it is estimated that women have a 1 in 35 lifetime risk of endometrial cancer, and in contrast to cancers of most other sites, cancer-specific mortality has risen by approximately 2% every year since 2008 related to the rapidly rising incidence.2Endometrial cancer has traditionally been classified into type I levaquin side effects eyes and type II based on morphology.3 The more common subtype, type I, is mostly comprised of endometrioid tumours and is oestrogen-driven, arises from a hyperplastic endometrium, presents at an early stage and has an excellent 5 year survival rate.4 By contrast, type II includes non-endometrioid tumours, specifically serous, carcinosarcoma and clear cell subtypes, which are biologically aggressive tumours with a poor prognosis that are often diagnosed at an advanced stage.5 Recent efforts have focused on a molecular classification system for more accurate categorisation of endometrial tumours into four groups with distinct prognostic profiles.6 7The majority of endometrial cancers arise through the interplay of familial, genetic and lifestyle factors. Two inherited cancer predisposition syndromes, Lynch syndrome and the much rarer Cowden syndrome, substantially increase the lifetime risk of endometrial cancer, but these only account for around 3–5% of cases.8–10 Having first or second degree relative(s) with endometrial or colorectal cancer increases endometrial cancer risk, although a large European twin study failed to demonstrate a strong heritable link.11 The authors failed to show that there was greater concordance in monozygotic than dizygotic twins, but the study was based on relatively small numbers of endometrial cancers. Lu and colleagues reported an association between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and endometrial cancer risk, revealing the potential role of SNPs in explaining part of the risk in both the familial and general populations.12 Thus far, many SNPs have been reported to modify susceptibility to endometrial cancer. However, much of this work predated genome wide association studies and is of variable quality.

Understanding genetic predisposition to endometrial cancer could facilitate personalised risk assessment with a view to targeted prevention and screening interventions.13 This emerged as the most important unanswered research question in endometrial cancer according to patients, carers and healthcare professionals in our recently completed James Lind Womb Cancer Alliance Priority Setting Partnership.14 It would be particularly useful for non-endometrioid endometrial cancers, for which advancing age is so far the only predictor.15We therefore conducted a comprehensive systematic review of the literature to provide an overview of the relationship between SNPs and endometrial cancer risk. We compiled a list of the most robust endometrial cancer-associated SNPs. We assessed the applicability of this panel of SNPs with a theoretical polygenic risk score (PRS) calculation. We also critically appraised the meta-analyses investigating the most frequently reported SNPs in MDM2.

Finally, we described all SNPs reported within genes and pathways that are likely involved in endometrial carcinogenesis and metastasis.MethodsOur systematic review follows the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) collaboration 2009 recommendations. The registered protocol is available through PROSPERO (CRD42018091907).16Search strategyWe searched Embase, MEDLINE and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases via the Healthcare Databases Advanced Search (HDAS) platform, from 2007 to 2018, to identify studies reporting associations between polymorphisms and endometrial cancer risk. Key words including MeSH (Medical Subject Heading) terms and free-text words were searched in both titles and abstracts. The following terms were used.

€œendomet*”,“uter*”, “womb”, “cancer(s)”, “neoplasm(s)”, “endometrium tumour”, “carcinoma”, “adenosarcoma”, “clear cell carcinoma”, “carcinosarcoma”, “SNP”, “single nucleotide polymorphism”, “GWAS”, and “genome-wide association study/ies”. No other restrictions were applied. The search was repeated with time restrictions between 2018 and June 2019 to capture any recent publications.Eligibility criteriaStudies were selected for full-text evaluation if they were primary articles investigating a relationship between endometrial cancer and SNPs. Study outcome was either the increased or decreased risk of endometrial cancer relative to controls reported as an odds ratio (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs).Study selectionThree independent reviewers screened all articles uploaded to a screening spreadsheet developed by Helena VonVille.17 Disagreements were resolved by discussion.

Chronbach’s α score was calculated between reviewers and indicated high consistency at 0.92. Case–control, prospective and retrospective studies, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and both discovery and validation studies were selected for full-text evaluation. Non-English articles, editorials, conference abstracts and proceedings, letters and correspondence, case reports and review articles were excluded.Candidate-gene studies with at least 100 women and GWAS with at least 1000 women in the case arm were selected to ensure reliability of the results, as explained by Spencer et al.18 To construct a panel of up to 30 SNPs with the strongest evidence of association, those with the strongest p values were selected. For the purpose of an SNP panel, articles utilising broad European or multi-ethnic cohorts were selected.

Where overlapping populations were identified, the most comprehensive study was included.Data extraction and synthesisFor each study, the following data were extracted. SNP ID, nearby gene(s)/chromosome location, OR (95% CI), p value, minor or effect allele frequency (MAF/EAF), EA (effect allele) and OA (other allele), adjustment, ethnicity and ancestry, number of cases and controls, endometrial cancer type, and study type including discovery or validation study and meta-analysis. For risk estimates, a preference towards most adjusted results was applied. For candidate-gene studies, a standard p value of<0.05 was applied and for GWAS a p value of <5×10-8, indicating genome-wide significance, was accepted as statistically significant.

However, due to the limited number of SNPs with p values reaching genome-wide significance, this threshold was then lowered to <1×10-5, allowing for marginally significant SNPs to be included. As shown by Mavaddat et al, for breast cancer, SNPs that fall below genome-wide significance may still be useful for generating a PRS and improving the models.19We estimated the potential value of a PRS based on the most significant SNPs by comparing the predicted risk for a woman with a risk score in the top 1% of the distribution to the mean predicted risk. Per-allele ORs and MAFs were taken from the publications and standard errors (SEs) for the lnORs were derived from published 95% CIs. The PRS was assumed to have a Normal distribution, with mean 2∑βipI and SE, σ, equal to √2∑βi2pI(1−pi), according to the binomial distribution, where the summation is over all SNPs in the risk score.

Hence the relative risk (RR) comparing the top 1% of the distribution to the mean is given by exp(Z0.01σ), where Z is the inverse of the standard normal cumulative distribution.ResultsThe flow chart of study selection is illustrated in figure 1. In total, 453 text articles were evaluated and, of those, 149 articles met our inclusion criteria. One study was excluded from table 1, for having an Asian-only population, as this would make it harder to compare with the rest of the results which were all either multi-ethnic or Caucasian cohorts, as stated in our inclusion criteria for the SNP panel.20 Any SNPs without 95% CIs were also excluded from any downstream analysis. Additionally, SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (r2 >0.2) with each other were examined, and of those in linkage disequilibrium, the SNP with strongest association was reported.

Per allele ORs were used unless stated otherwise.View this table:Table 1 List of top SNPs most likely to contribute to endometrial cancer risk identified through systematic review of recent literature21–25Study selection flow diagram. *Reasons. Irrelevant articles, articles focusing on other conditions, non-GWAS/candidate-gene study related articles, technical and duplicate articles. GWAS, genome-wide association study.

Adapted from. Moher D, Liberati A, Tetzlaff J, Altman DG, The PRISMA Group (2009). Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. The PRISMA Statement.

PLoS Med 6(6). E1000097. Doi:10.1371/journal.pmed1000097." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 1 Study selection flow diagram. *Reasons.

Irrelevant articles, articles focusing on other conditions, non-GWAS/candidate-gene study related articles, technical and duplicate articles. GWAS, genome-wide association study. Adapted from. Moher D, Liberati A, Tetzlaff J, Altman DG, The PRISMA Group (2009).

Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. The PRISMA Statement. PLoS Med 6(6). E1000097.

Doi:10.1371/journal.pmed1000097.Top SNPs associated with endometrial cancer riskFollowing careful interpretation of the data, 24 independent SNPs with the lowest p values that showed the strongest association with endometrial cancer were obtained (table 1).21–25 These SNPs are located in or around genes coding for transcription factors, cell growth and apoptosis regulators, and enzymes involved in the steroidogenesis pathway. All the SNPs presented here were reported on the basis of a GWAS or in one case, an exome-wide association study, and hence no SNPs from candidate-gene studies made it to the list. This is partly due to the nature of larger GWAS providing more comprehensive and powered results as opposed to candidate gene studies. Additionally, a vast majority of SNPs reported by candidate-gene studies were later refuted by large-scale GWAS such as in the case of TERT and MDM2 variants.26 27 The exception to this is the CYP19 gene, where candidate-gene studies reported an association between variants in this gene with endometrial cancer in both Asian and broad European populations, and this association was more recently confirmed by large-scale GWAS.21 28–30 Moreover, a recent article authored by O’Mara and colleagues reviewed the GWAS that identified most of the currently known SNPs associated with endometrial cancer.31Most of the studies represented in table 1 are GWAS and the majority of these involved broad European populations.

Those having a multi-ethnic cohort also consisted primarily of broad European populations. Only four of the variants in table 1 are located in coding regions of a gene, or in regulatory flanking regions around the gene. Thus, most of these variants would not be expected to cause any functional effects on the gene or the resulting protein. An eQTL search using GTEx Portal showed that some of the SNPs are significantly associated (p<0.05) with modified transcription levels of the respective genes in various tissues such as prostate (rs11263761), thyroid (rs9668337), pituitary (rs2747716), breast mammary (rs882380) and testicular (rs2498794) tissue, as summarised in table 2.View this table:Table 2 List of eQTL hits for the selected panel of SNPsThe only variant for which there was an indication of a specific association with non-endometrioid endometrial cancer was rs148261157 near the BCL11A gene.

The A allele of this SNP had a moderately higher association in the non-endometrioid arm (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.32 to 2.04. P=9.6×10-6) compared with the endometrioid arm (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.38. P=4.7×10-6).21Oestrogen receptors α and β encoded by ESR1 and ESR2, respectively, have been extensively studied due to the assumed role of oestrogens in the development of endometrial cancer. O’Mara et al reported a lead SNP (rs79575945) in the ESR1 region that was associated with endometrial cancer (p=1.86×10-5).24 However, this SNP did not reach genome-wide significance in a more recent larger GWAS.21 No statistically significant associations have been reported between endometrial cancer and SNPs in the ESR2 gene region.AKT is an oncogene linked to endometrial carcinogenesis.

It is involved in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pro-proliferative signalling pathway to inactivate apoptosis and allow cell survival. The A allele of rs2494737 and G allele of rs2498796 were reported to be associated with increased and decreased risk of endometrial cancer in 2016, respectively.22 30 However, this association was not replicated in a larger GWAS in 2018.21 Nevertheless, given the previous strong indications, and biological basis that could explain endometrial carcinogenesis, we decided to include an AKT1 variant (rs2498794) in our results.PTEN is a multi-functional tumour suppressor gene that regulates the AKT/PKB signalling pathway and is commonly mutated in many cancers including endometrial cancer.32 Loss-of-function germline mutations in PTEN are responsible for Cowden syndrome, which exerts a lifetime risk of endometrial cancer of up to 28%.9 Lacey and colleagues studied SNPs in the PTEN gene region. However, none showed significant differences in frequency between 447 endometrial cancer cases and 439 controls of European ancestry.33KRAS mutations are known to be present in endometrial cancer. These can be activated by high levels of KLF5 (transcriptional activator).

Three SNPs have been identified in or around KLF5 that are associated with endometrial cancer. The G allele of rs11841589 (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.21. P=4.83×10-11), the A allele of rs9600103 (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.30. P=3.76×10-12) and C allele of rs7981863 (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.20.

P=2.70×10-17) have all been found to be associated with an increased likelihood of endometrial cancer in large European cohorts.21 30 34 It is worth noting that these SNPs are not independent, and hence they quite possibly tag the same causal variant.The MYC family of proto-oncogenes encode transcription factors that regulate cell proliferation, which can contribute to cancer development if dysregulated. The recent GWAS by O’Mara et al reported three SNPs within the MYC region that reached genome-wide significance with conditional p values reaching at least 5×10–8.35To test the utility of these SNPs as predictive markers, we devised a theoretical PRS calculation using the log ORs and EAFs per SNP from the published data. The results were very encouraging with an RR of 3.16 for the top 1% versus the mean, using all the top SNPs presented in table 1 and 2.09 when using only the SNPs that reached genome-wide significance (including AKT1).Controversy surrounding MDM2 variant SNP309MDM2 negatively regulates tumour suppressor gene TP53, and as such, has been extensively studied in relation to its potential role in predisposition to endometrial cancer. Our search identified six original studies of the association between MDM2 SNP rs2279744 (also referred to as SNP309) and endometrial cancer, all of which found a statistically significant increased risk per copy of the G allele.

Two more original studies were identified through our full-text evaluation. However, these were not included here as they did not meet our inclusion criteria—one due to small sample size, the other due to studying rs2279744 status dependent on another SNP.36 37 Even so, the two studies were described in multiple meta-analyses that are listed in table 3. Different permutations of these eight original studies appear in at least eight published meta-analyses. However, even the largest meta-analysis contained <2000 cases (table 3)38View this table:Table 3 Characteristics of studies that examined MDM2 SNP rs2279744In comparison, a GWAS including nearly 13 000 cases found no evidence of an association with OR and corresponding 95% CI of 1.00 (0.97 to 1.03) and a p value of 0.93 (personal communication).21 Nevertheless, we cannot completely rule out a role for MDM2 variants in endometrial cancer predisposition as the candidate-gene studies reported larger effects in Asians, whereas the GWAS primarily contained participants of European ancestry.

There is also some suggestion that the SNP309 variant is in linkage disequilibrium with another variant, SNP285, which confers an opposite effect.It is worth noting that the SNP285C/SNP309G haplotype frequency was observed in up to 8% of Europeans, thus requiring correction for the confounding effect of SNP285C in European studies.39 However, aside from one study conducted by Knappskog et al, no other study including the meta-analyses corrected for the confounding effect of SNP285.40 Among the studies presented in table 3, Knappskog et al (2012) reported that after correcting for SNP285, the OR for association of this haplotype with endometrial cancer was much lower, though still significant. Unfortunately, the meta-analyses which synthesised Knappskog et al (2012), as part of their analysis, did not correct for SNP285C in the European-based studies they included.38 41 42 It is also concerning that two meta-analyses using the same primary articles failed to report the same result, in two instances.38 42–44DiscussionThis article represents the most comprehensive systematic review to date, regarding critical appraisal of the available evidence of common low-penetrance variants implicated in predisposition to endometrial cancer. We have identified the most robust SNPs in the context of endometrial cancer risk. Of those, only 19 were significant at genome-wide level and a further five were considered marginally significant.

The largest GWAS conducted in this field was the discovery- and meta-GWAS by O’Mara et al, which utilised 12 096 cases and 108 979 controls.21 Despite the inclusion of all published GWAS and around 5000 newly genotyped cases, the total number did not reach anywhere near what is currently available for other common cancers such as breast cancer. For instance, BCAC (Breast Cancer Association Consortium) stands at well over 200 000 individuals with more than half being cases, and resulted in identification of ~170 SNPs in relation to breast cancer.19 45 A total of 313 SNPs including imputations were then used to derive a PRS for breast cancer.19 Therefore, further efforts should be directed to recruit more patients, with deep phenotypic clinical data to allow for relevant adjustments and subgroup analyses to be conducted for better precision.A recent pre-print study by Zhang and colleagues examined the polygenicity and potential for SNP-based risk prediction for 14 common cancers, including endometrial cancer, using available summary-level data from European-ancestry datasets.46 They estimated that there are just over 1000 independent endometrial cancer susceptibility SNPs, and that a PRS comprising all such SNPs would have an area under the receiver-operator curve of 0.64, similar to that predicted for ovarian cancer, but lower than that for the other cancers in the study. The modelling in the paper suggests that an endometrial cancer GWAS double the size of the current largest study would be able to identify susceptibility SNPs together explaining 40% of the genetic variance, but that in order to explain 75% of the genetic variance it would be necessary to have a GWAS comprising close to 150 000 cases and controls, far in excess of what is currently feasible.We found that the literature consists mainly of candidate-gene studies with small sample sizes, meta-analyses reporting conflicting results despite using the same set of primary articles, and multiple reports of significant SNPs that have not been validated by any larger GWAS. The candidate-gene studies were indeed the most useful and cheaper technique available until the mid to late 2000s.

However, a lack of reproducibility (particularly due to population stratification and reporting bias), uncertainty of reported associations, and considerably high false discovery rates make these studies much less appropriate in the post-GWAS era. Unlike the candidate-gene approach, GWAS do not require prior knowledge, selection of genes or SNPs, and provide vast amounts of data. Furthermore, both the genotyping process and data analysis phases have become cheaper, the latter particularly due to faster and open-access pre-phasing and imputation tools being made available.It is clear from table 1 that some SNPs were reported with wide 95% CI, which can be directly attributed to small sample sizes particularly when restricting the cases to non-endometrioid histology only, low EAF or poor imputation quality. Thus, these should be interpreted with caution.

Additionally, most of the SNPs reported by candidate-gene studies were not detected by the largest GWAS to date conducted by O’Mara et al.21 However, this does not necessarily mean that the possibility of those SNPs being relevant should be completely dismissed. Moreover, meta-analyses were attempted for other variants. However, these showed no statistically significant association and many presented with high heterogeneity between the respective studies (data not shown). Furthermore, as many studies utilised the same set of cases and/or controls, conducting a meta-analysis was not possible for a good number of SNPs.

It is therefore unequivocal that the literature is crowded with numerous small candidate-gene studies and conflicting data. This makes it particularly hard to detect novel SNPs and conduct meaningful meta-analyses.We found convincing evidence for 19 variants that indicated the strongest association with endometrial cancer, as shown in table 1. The associations between endometrial cancer and variants in or around HNF1B, CYP19A1, SOX4, MYC, KLF and EIF2AK found in earlier GWAS were then replicated in the latest and largest GWAS. These SNPs showed promising potential in a theoretical PRS we devised based on published data.

Using all 24 or genome-wide significant SNPs only, women with a PRS in the top 1% of the distribution would be predicted to have a risk of endometrial cancer 3.16 and 2.09 times higher than the mean risk, respectively.However, the importance of these variants and relevance of the proximate genes in a functional or biological context is challenging to evaluate. Long distance promoter regulation by enhancers may disguise the genuine target gene. In addition, enhancers often do not loop to the nearest gene, further complicating the relevance of nearby gene(s) to a GWAS hit. In order to elucidate biologically relevant candidate target genes in endometrial cancer, O’Mara et al looked into promoter-associated chromatin looping using a modern HiChIP approach.47 The authors utilised normal and tumoural endometrial cell lines for this analysis which showed significant enrichment for endometrial cancer heritability, with 103 candidate target genes identified across the 13 risk loci identified by the largest ECAC GWAS.

Notable genes identified here were CDKN2A and WT1, and their antisense counterparts. The former was reported to be nearby of rs1679014 and the latter of rs10835920, as shown in table 1. Moreover, of the 36 candidate target genes, 17 were found to be downregulated while 19 were upregulated in endometrial tumours.The authors also investigated overlap between the 13 endometrial cancer risk loci and top eQTL variants for each target gene.47 In whole blood, of the two particular lead SNPs, rs8822380 at 17q21.32 was a top eQTL for SNX11 and HOXB2, whereas rs937213 at 15q15.1 was a top eQTL for SRP14. In endometrial tumour, rs7579014 at 2p16.1 was found to be a top eQTL for BCL11A.

This is particularly interesting because BCL11A was the only nearby/candidate gene that had a GWAS association reported in both endometrioid and non-endometrioid subtypes. The study looked at protein–protein interactions between endometrial cancer drivers and candidate target gene products. Significant interactions were observed with TP53 (most significant), AKT, PTEN, ESR1 and KRAS, among others. Finally, when 103 target candidate genes and 387 proteins were combined together, 462 pathways were found to be significantly enriched.

Many of these are related to gene regulation, cancer, obesity, insulinaemia and oestrogen exposure. This study clearly showed a potential biological relevance for some of the SNPs reported by ECAC GWAS in 2018.Most of the larger included studies used cohorts primarily composed of women of broad European descent. Hence, there are negligible data available for other ethnicities, particularly African women. This is compounded by the lack of reference genotype data available for comparative analysis, making it harder for research to be conducted in ethnicities other than Europeans.

This poses a problem for developing risk prediction models that are equally valuable and predictive across populations. Thus, our results also are of limited applicability to non-European populations.Furthermore, considering that non-endometrioid cases comprise a small proportion (~20%) of all endometrial cancer cases, much larger cohort sizes are needed to detect any genuine signals for non-endometrioid tumours. Most of the evaluated studies looked at either overall/mixed endometrial cancer subtypes or endometrioid histology, and those that looked at variant associations with non-endometrioid histology were unlikely to have enough power to detect any signal with statistical significance. This is particularly concerning because non-endometrioid subtypes are biologically aggressive tumours with a much poorer prognosis that contribute disproportionately to mortality from endometrial cancer.

It is particularly important that attempts to improve early detection and prevention of endometrial cancer focus primarily on improving outcomes from these subtypes. It is also worth noting that, despite the current shift towards a molecular classification of endometrial cancer, most studies used the overarching classical Bokhman’s classification system, type I versus type II, or no histological classification system at all. Therefore, it is important to create and follow a standardised and comprehensive classification system for reporting tumour subtypes for future studies.This study compiled and presented available information for an extensively studied, yet unproven in large datasets, SNP309 variant in MDM2. Currently, there is no convincing evidence for an association between this variant and endometrial cancer risk.

Additionally, of all the studies, only one accounted for the opposing effect of a nearby variant SNP285 in their analyses. Thus, we conclude that until confirmed by a sufficiently large GWAS, this variant should not be considered significant in influencing the risk of endometrial cancer and therefore not included in a PRS. This is also true for the majority of the SNPs reported in candidate-gene studies, as the numbers fall far short of being able to detect genuine signals.This systematic review presents the most up-to-date evidence for endometrial cancer susceptibility variants, emphasising the need for further large-scale studies to identify more variants of importance, and validation of these associations. Until data from larger and more diverse cohorts are available, the top 24 SNPs presented here are the most robust common genetic variants that affect endometrial cancer risk.

The multiplicative effects of these SNPs could be used in a PRS to allow personalised risk prediction models to be developed for targeted screening and prevention interventions for women at greatest risk of endometrial cancer..

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